Cultures of Politics/Politics of Cultures: Re-Visioning Latin American Social Movements

By Sonia E. Alvarez; Evelina Dagnino et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter Ten
Beyond the Domestic and the Public: Colonas Participation in Urban Movements in Mexico City

MIGUEL DÍAZ-BARRIGA

No nos importó que los esposos se enojasen con nosotras, que nos bronqueran. Nosotros venimos arrastrando una cadena de miseria en este pais, las gentes más jodidas. No tener casa implica una serie de problemas y los señores estaban acostumbrados a que las mujeres estábamos dispuestas a perder todo, menos el marido. Nomás que llegando aquí cambió totalmente la situación. . . . Entendimos que defender la familia significa ser ilibres!, ino libertinas!, que mucha gente ha confundido la situación. . . . "Ah esas viejas revoltosas, izquerdistas, mitoteras, guerrilleras, marimachas." No es cierto, nosotras fuimos mujeres de no desprendernos de nuestras obligaciones de mujeres, pero nos dimos el tiempo para andar en la lucha. Hacíamos de comer en la noche y nuestros esposos no se quedaban sin comer.

It did not matter to us that our spouses got mad at us, that they fought with us. In this country we, the people who are the most screwed over, carry around a chain of misery. Not having a house implies a series of problems and men are accustomed to think that women are capable of losing everything, except their husbands. However, once we arrived here [to this neighborhood] this completely changed the situation. We understood that defending our family means being free, not being loose women. Indeed, many people have misunderstood our situation. They say, "Ah, these rebellious women, leftists, big-mouths, guerrillas, tomboys." This is not true! We were not women who put aside our responsibilities, we created time to participate in the struggle. We always prepared the evening meal and our husbands were never left without something to eat.

-- Pilar, a participant in the urban movement of Campamento 2 de Octubre1

-252-

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