Cultures of Politics/Politics of Cultures: Re-Visioning Latin American Social Movements

By Sonia E. Alvarez; Evelina Dagnino et al. | Go to book overview

moral importance of "bearing witness" is certainly not exclusive to Quakers). But witnessing at distance cannot only be conceived of as a floating entity, a segment of a moral economy, that appeals to enlightened individuals' indignity. It needs to transform its moral outrage into changes in the real world, into action. And this is what the Internet allows: the existence of "activism at distance" with a strong capability of intervening in the course of real events. Only the Internet allows for instantaneous, collective, decentered "activism at distance." In another paradoxical operation of cyberspace, it enlarges the public sphere and political action through the virtual world and reduces them in the real one.

Images of violence perpetrated by political or institutional agents and the possibility that related information will be widely disseminated represent an effective means of controlling abuses. But neither witnessing nor activism at distance are entirely efficient weapons at the disposal of political activists. This recognition brings up the difficult topic of the relationship between power and information. First, a ruler may dispose of a large quantity of information indicating positions against the ruler's own real or presumed actions, although this does not mean that the ruler will necessarily take them into consideration. Second, pressure exerted by activism at distance capable of harming those in power is part of the reality of politics, but it can reasonably be assumed that decisions made by those power holders are mostly measured in terms of real-world power alliances and calculations. Finally, all political subjects struggle for visibility in mass societies' battlefields and resort to different media to achieve their goals. What determines whether an issue gains wide recognition is a complex amalgamation of social energies deriving from many different contexts, including fortuitous events.

It is true that the diffusion of information is positively correlated to the democratization of access to power. However, if we take into consideration that books, public education, and the mass media have destroyed neither the profound existing social inequalities nor the abuse of power, we can predict that computer networks will come no closer to representing a true libertarian panacea. In spite of virtual reality's growing importance in the contemporary world, power is, in the last instance, defined by social, economic, and political relationships that are played out in the real world.


Notes
1
See Alvarez 1995; Appadurai 1990, 1991; Aranha Filho 1996; Canclini 1995; Carey and Quirk 1996; Cocco 1996; Commission on Global Governance 1995; Edwards 1994; Ellias 1994; Escobar 1994; Feenberg 1990; Fernandes 1995; Hakken 1993; Hannerz 1992; Inoue 1995; Leis 1995; Lévy 1993; Rheingold 1994; Ribeiro 1994a, 1994b, 1996; Rosenau 1992; Roszak 1994; Schiller 1996; Stallabrass 1995; Stone 1992, 1994, 1995; Wapner 1995. For a related set of works see note 2 below.
2
A brief list would include Barnet and Cavanaugh 1994; Breton 1994; Featherstone 1990; Giddens 1990; Harvey 1989; Ianni 1995; Mattelart 1994; Monetta 1994; Ortiz 1994; Santos et al. 1994; Sassen 1991; Sklair 1991. Works such as Wolf 1982 and Nash 1981, 1983 maybe con-

-345-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cultures of Politics/Politics of Cultures: Re-Visioning Latin American Social Movements
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 459

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.