The Other Side of the Frontier: Economic Explorations into Native American History

By Linda Barrington | Go to book overview

nous economic development. The story of the Mississippian economy is one of long-distance trade, production specialization, and social hierarchy. The Mississippians were not a "primitive" people, producing only for subsistence consumption. An artisan class produced the more skill-intensive goods such as flint blades, while others produced and transported the food to feed the artisans. The record of the importation of luxury goods consumed by the Mississippian urban elite demonstrates that that society was hierarchical. And eyewitness accounts from the first contact with Europeans confirm that the Mississippian elite exacted tribute in both goods and coerced labor.

The social hierarchy and degree of economic and urban development within the Mississippian civilization is thus at odds with the commonly held belief that all indigenous peoples north of the Rio Grande lived in egalitarian hunting and gathering communities prior to European contact. Urban clusters did exist within Mississippian civilization, providing the stimulus and labor force for substantial development. With the arrival of the colonizers from Europe, the influence that indigenous Americans had on the economic history of the region did not come to an end. Pre-Columbian nations molded the future economic development of the New World in more ways than just teaching the pilgrims to plant corn or increasing the cost of European land acquisition through diplomatic, litigious, and violent opposition to the expropriation of their land. New World institutions arose from the interaction between indigenous and colonial economic interests. Previously acquired wealth, varying population densities, and social hierarchies of indigenous peoples impacted the economic development of the region.


Notes

This chapter benefited greatly from the comments and suggestions of David Wishart, Kenneth Sokoloff, Margaret Levenstein, Stanley Engerman, and Alan Dye. Ellyn Artis and Arianne De Govia provided valuable research assistance.

1
Another work that postulates an important role for precolonial indigenous institutions in long-term American economic growth is Engerman and Sokoloff 1994.
2
Lithic production from Dover County, Tennessee, overtook that of Mill Creek, Illinois, sometime after A.D. 1200. This was despite the greater distance between Dover County and Cahokia. The growth of a subsequent production site farther from Cahokia, and hence more costly, is economically consistent with the exhaustion of the Mill Creek, Illinois, mines.
3
Reports by the Spanish conquistadores also claim that the dominant town in this region had more than 500 houses and the paramount chief had domain over some 30,000 warriors ( Shaffer 1992, 69).
4
Marvin Smith and David Hally make an interesting comparison between the probable practice of Mississippian paramount chiefs visiting tributary villages to maintain allegiance and similar practices in aboriginal Hawaii ( 1992, 106).

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Other Side of the Frontier: Economic Explorations into Native American History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 301

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.