The Other Side of the Frontier: Economic Explorations into Native American History

By Linda Barrington | Go to book overview

which have been stated to us are correct, and of which we have no doubt, that they will be found wanting. 60

Did supporters of the Cherokee removal deliberately understate the extent of economic progress in the Eastern Cherokee Nation? The political end of instituting a general policy of Indian removal was certainly well served by understating the size of the surplus-producing class of Cherokee. Moreover, the practical effect of removal was the transfer of rents in the form of improved acreage capable of surplus production to white farmers. A thorough analysis of the political economy of the Cherokee removal might find that the policy was a politically pragmatic transfer of wealth from Cherokee households to white farmers, even if the supporters of removal believed at the time that it was a humanitarian policy toward an indigenous population.

Could the Cherokee have survived in the Southeast after 1835? From a purely economic standpoint, almost certainly they could have. However, from a political standpoint it is less clear. Cherokee property rights were anything but secure in the Southeast in the 1830s. The federal government was hardly inclined to defend the property rights of an Indian nation against the depredations of white settlers and their state governments in this period. Under these circumstances, there was little choice for the Cherokee but to endure the cost of a forced migration to Oklahoma and to begin the task of establishing new communities in a very different setting.


Notes

I thank a series of undergraduate research assistants for their help reading microfilm and entering data. They are Jamie Shilling, Brian Mauser, Stanley Zikhali, David Hart, Mark Johnson, Jeff Miller, Anne Lindman, and Sherri West. I also thank Louis Cain, Thomas T. Taylor, Richard Sullivan, Larry Neal, Jeremy Atack, Thomas Ulen, Lee Alston, Joan Orr, and Douglas Wilms for numerous comments on earlier drafts. I am indebted to participants at Economic History Workshops at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, and to participants at the Economic History Seminar at Columbia University, who have contributed many useful suggestions. Of course, remaining errors are my own. This research was supported in part by a grant from the Wittenberg University Faculty Research Fund Board. Portions of this chapter are taken from the article "Evidence of Surplus Production in the Cherokee Nation Prior to Removal," which appeared in The Journal of Economic History 55, no. 1 ( March 1995): 120-138. Reprinted with permission of Cambridge University Press.

1
John Phillip Reid, A Better Kind of Hatchet. Law, Trade, and Diplomacy in the Cherokee Nation During the Early Years of European Contact (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1976), 2.

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Other Side of the Frontier: Economic Explorations into Native American History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 301

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.