The Other Side of the Frontier: Economic Explorations into Native American History

By Linda Barrington | Go to book overview
0.96). Even when one outlier in the second period is removed, causing the ratio to fall to 0.396, the difference is not significant (t = 1.03). The outlier is 1876, when Custer's Last Stand made the ratio 2.5, over six times above the mean for the other years.
10
"An insidious by-product of the treaty system was the annuity system -- the practice of paying for land with cash dispensed in annual installments over a period of years. It was a system highly vulnerable to abuse by politically well-connected traders, who sat at disbursing tables each year to collect real or fictional debts run up during the year by the Indians" ( Utley 1984, 45). The potential for skimming payments owed to Indians made positions as government Indian agents valuable in the late nineteenth century, and they were frequently allocated by political pressure and corruption.
11
The values are normalized, of course, to present a common scale of measurement. The extraordinary size of the army during the Civil War and the extraordinary number of Indian battles thereafter cause the extent of change in army size during the Mexican War and battles thereafter to appear insignificant. Both were, in fact, quite significant relative to the periods immediately before and after. Regression analysis presented in the longer version of our paper shows that army growth during both the Mexican and Civil Wars, independent of one another, had significant effects on the number of battles with Indians afterwards, all else equal. Naturally, since army growth was much greater during the Civil War, the size of the postwar effect on Inthan battles was greater than that for the Mexican War. It is interesting, too, that estimates of the effect of a given year's battles on next year's army size show no significant impact. In other words, army size this year affects the number of battles next year, but not vice versa.

References

Anderson Terry. 1994. "Raid or Trade? An Economic Model of Indian-White Relations". Journal of Law and Economics 36 (April):39-74.

Anderson Terry L., and Peter J. Hill. 1979. "The Not So Wild, Wild West". Journal of Libertarian Studies 3:9-29.

Beers Henry E. 1975. The Military Frontier, 1815-46. Philadelphia: Porcupine Press.

Chapel Charles E. 1961. Guns of the Old West. New York: Coward-McCann.

Cohen Felix. 1947. "Original Indian Title". Minnesota Law Review 32:28-59.

Connell Evan S. 1988. Cavalier in Buckskin. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.

Cooter Robert D., and Daniel L. Rubinfeld. 1989. "Economic Analysis of Legal Disputes and Their Resolution". Journal of Economic Literature 27:1067-1097.

Debo Angie. 1989. A History of the Indians of the United States. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.

Hirshleifer Jack. 1994. "The Dark Side of the Force". Economic Inquiry 32 (January): 1-10.

Hughes Jonathan R. T. 1976. Social Control in the Colonial Economy. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia.

Kickingbird Kirke, and Karen Ducheneaus. 1973. One Hundred Million Acres. New York: Macmillan.

-222-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Other Side of the Frontier: Economic Explorations into Native American History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 301

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.