Realignment and Party Revival: Understanding American Electoral Politics at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century

By Arthur Paulson | Go to book overview

percentage of the vote for Nixon and Wallace than the country in 1968 are classified as "liberal." All other states are classified as "moderate." These classifications are valid because the Republican Presidential nominees in all three elections, Goldwater and Nixon, are clearly more conservative than the Democrats Johnson, Humphrey, and McGovern. The Wallace candidacy of 1968 represents a nonpartisan but decidedly conservative vote. Finally, all three elections represent cases in which the electorate was polarized over the salient issues, particularly civil rights and the Vietnam War.

Table 1.19 illustrates the political geography of both the electoral change and the ideological polarization. Eight of the ten most liberal states are found in the northeast quadrant, with the other two on the west coast. All ten have shifted dramatically toward the Democrats in Presidential elections. Almost all of the most conservative states are found in the south and west and have shifted toward the Republicans in Presidential elections. These conservative states make up the "L" on the electoral map so central to the Democratic coalitions of a century ago and the Republican coalitions of today. Finally, the states in the ideological center show the greatest degree of electoral stability.

The next five chapters develop this theme by addressing the ideological alignment of states in factions within the political parties.


CONCLUSION

As the turn of the twenty-first century approaches, Presidential elections continue to be shaped by a realignment that reached critical proportions between 1964 and 1972. In terms of the change in the coalition of states, the 1964-1972 period represents the most profound realignment in American history. The question remains: Why was it not recognized as such?

The central methodological problem is that dealignment theorists who have been "waiting for Godot" have been waiting for something that even realignment theory, properly understood, would not predict. They have been waiting for a realignment that would fit a rigid ahistorical model and appear just like 1932, or perhaps 1896. But our review demonstrates what many dealignment theorists forget, that previous realignments have not looked much like each other, either.

For example, critical realignment is expected to displace the normal majority party and produce a new national majority party. This did in fact take place in 1932, to a degree that the New Deal realignment fits the model on that score perfectly. But the realignment of 1896 fits the model only imperfectly, and, of course, the dealignment period since the 1960s does not satisfy that prediction at all. Prior to 1896 there was

-18-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Realignment and Party Revival: Understanding American Electoral Politics at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.