Realignment and Party Revival: Understanding American Electoral Politics at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century

By Arthur Paulson | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
See Nelson Polsby, "Coalition and Faction in American Politics: An Institutional View," in Seymour Martin Lipset, ed., Emerging Coalitions in American Politics ( San Francisco: Institute for Contemporary Studies, 1978), pp. 103-123.
2.
See Stephen Skowronek, The Politics Presidents Make: Leadership from John Adams to Bill Clinton ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1997), pp. 227-259. See also H. W. Brands, T.R.: The Last Romantic ( New York: Basic Books, 1997), pp. 417-637; and Samuel and Dorothy Rosenman, Presidential Style: Some Giants and a Pygmy in the White House ( New York: Harper and Row, 1976), pp. 1-123.
3.
For the classic discussion of the executive and legislative wings of the Democratic and Republican parties, see James MacGregor Burns, The Deadlock of Democracy: Four Party Politics in America ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1967).
4.
Unless otherwise noted, all data on Presidential primaries is drawn from Presidential Elections, 1789-1996 ( Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1997). Convention data is drawn or derived from National Party Conventions, 1831-1996 ( Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1997). Discussion of conventions is drawn from National Party Conventions and from Richard C. Bain and Judith H. Parris, Convention Decisions and Voting Records ( Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, 1973).
5.
For an interesting account of the concurrent 1916 Republican and Progressive conventions, see William Draper Lewis, The Life of Theodore Roosevelt ( United Publishers, 1919). Lewis's book is a generally admiring biography of the late President, published just after Roosevelt's death, but its account is consistent with the record of the conventions. See also National Party Conventions, pp. 72-73.
6.
Steve Neal, Dark Horse: A Biography of Wendell Willkie ( Lawrence, Kans.: University Press of Kansas, 1989), p. 58.
7.
Most of the discussion of the Willkie campaign is drawn from Neal, pp. 45-180, and from Ellsworth Barnard, Wendell Willkie: Fighter for Freedom ( Marquette, Mich.: Northern Michigan University Press, 1966), pp. 142-268. See also Herbert S. Parmet and Marie B. Hecht, Never Again: A President Runs for a Third Term ( New York: Macmillan, 1968).
8.
Neal, pp. 78 and 108.
9.
See Wendell L. Willkie, One World ( New York: Simon and Schuster, 1943) and Willkie, An American Program ( New York: Simon and Schuster, 1944).
10.
Neal, Dark Horse, pp. 267-270. The case was Schneiderman v. U.S. 320 U.S. 118 ( 1943).
15.
Ibid., p. 284. See also Barnard, pp. 406-421.
16.
See Neal, pp. 308-324, and Barnard, pp. 470-503.
17.
William R. Keech and Donald R. Matthews, The Party's Choice ( Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, 1977), pp. 172-177.
18.
See Dwight D. Eisenhower, Mandate for Change ( New York: Doubleday, 1965), pp. 218-222.
19.
See Brown v. Board of Education 347 U.S. 483 ( 1954); Brown v. Board of Education II 349 U.S. 294; and Cooper v. Aaron 357 U.S. 566 ( 1958). See also Dwight D.

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