Realignment and Party Revival: Understanding American Electoral Politics at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century

By Arthur Paulson | Go to book overview
Jesse Jackson in 1988 or Pat Buchanan and Jerry Brown in 1992. 17 But that candidate has no chance at the nomination. The conflict over the platform, between party leaders, now focused on winning the election, and activists, still focused on issues, is a family conflict among liberals in the Democratic Party and conservatives in the Republican Party. Although the front-runner can help or hurt his or her chances in the coming election by how he or she handles the conflict, the nomination is not in jeopardy.

Finally, although the distinction between issue activists and party leaders is still a useful one, increasingly party leaders have gained their position with the support of issue activists rather than party professionals; and increasingly, issue activists are party leaders. Presidents are not only nominated by issue activists, they take issue activists to the White House. The Republican Congress elected in 1994 and the elevation of Newt Gingrich to the House Speakership are examples of issue activists becoming party leaders. Certainly that process creates some role conflict, both between politicians with conflicting agendas and within individuals torn by competing priorities. But this new style of leadership, and the role conflict it brings with it, is testimony to the emerging, ideologically homogenized political party.


CONCLUSION

The new, more nationalized and ideologically homogenized political parties, aggregating internally more harmonious interests than the nineteenth-century parties, are more unified than the nineteenth-century parties, a fact that has been apparent in changing patterns of Presidential nominations since the ideological polarization between the parties of the 1960s.

The evidence presented here suggests that factional realignment within parties is as important to the study of the party system as is electoral realignment between the parties. The "realignment at the top" in Presidential elections was as much an intraparty realignment as it was an interparty realignment. But neither realignment was recognized as it happened because it took so long to spread to the "bottom." The secular spread of realignment from the top to the bottom and its relationship to split-ticket voting and divided government is the subject of Chapter 7.

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Realignment and Party Revival: Understanding American Electoral Politics at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.