Tennis: Its History, People and Events

By Will Grimsley | Go to book overview

Foreword

Since first seeing Will Grimsley's exhaustive book, Golf: Its History, People and Events, I had hoped someone might undertake a similar project involving tennis. Now I am pleased to find that Grimsley has done this himself, and tennis is certain to be better off for it.

Tennis is a game rich in tradition, personalities, exciting events and even controversy. To attempt to reach back and try to capture all -- or at least most of this -- and put it inside the covers of a single book is a monumental endeavor. I must congratulate Grimsley on his enterprise and his bravery.

This must be the most comprehensive and ambitious volume written on the sport. Library shelves are loaded with excellent books dealing with every phase of the game but I know of none that has tried to explore the broad reaches from the first primitive bats and balls right up to open competition, with all that has happened between.

I have known Grimsley for years, as have other tennis players whose exploits he has followed from Wimbledon to Melbourne and Madras to Paris. For most of the last two decades he has been a sort of ex-officio member of the Davis Cup teams traveling to Australia. He has lived or seen firsthand much of the drama of which he writes.

As a world-girdling writer for The Associated Press, Grimsley has written graphically on many sports, ranging from the Olympic Games to World Cup golf matches, and has done probing stories behind the Iron Curtain. But he seems to write with the greatest warmth and vividness when he writes of tennis, a sport he apparently loves.

This massive book, which also includes an interesting and knowledgeable study of the styles of the great by Julius Heldman, is an example. It is written in Grimsley's easy, flowing style. It moves. And it doesn't miss much.

William F. (Bill) Talbert

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Tennis: Its History, People and Events
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Foreword *
  • Preface *
  • Contents *
  • One 1
  • Two 31
  • Three 191
  • Four 233
  • Five 289
  • Index 371
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