The Women's Movements of the United States and Western Europe: Consciousness, Political Opportunity, and Public Policy

By Mary Fainsod Katzenstein; Carol McClurg Mueller | Go to book overview

and active in pressing their own concerns, as in the agitation for equal pay in the late 1960s, the efforts were localized and specific to certain companies or groups of workers. In addition, even the most aggressive agitation had little impact on the TUC's position within the tripartite negotiations for equal pay. The final formulation of the Equal Pay Act reflected the tripartite consensus, not the preferred feminist version. This is not to say that British unions have been unresponsive to women workers. Joyce Gelb (see Chapter 12) discusses several areas of union support, such as day care and abortion. None of these areas of support, however, jeopardizes the more important role of the TUC within the tripartite system, a system that is separate from women's issues in both theory and practice. It is perfectly plausible to suggest that had women in Britain been more active and more consistently so, more could have been achieved. But it is less speculative and more to the point to explain why women in Britain have not become a stronger social and political force. Their incapacitation is understandable, given the pattern of fragmented interest structuration prevailing in Britain. Britain is indeed a patriarchal society. But I have suggested that it is the persisting fact of divisiveness, and the persisting onus of self-interest that derives from divisiveness, that explain lack of progress, for women as for all workers -- and not the fact of gender alone.

The case of Sweden forms an important contrast -- up to a point. Politics in Sweden are based on broad coalitions and a concerted effort to mitigate differences for the sake of rational economic growth. Such progress for women as has occurred in Sweden has advanced within this framework -- and Swedish progress has been remarkable compared to that of other countries. But lately the confines of this framework and its limitations on the full achievement of equality for women have become more apparent. In particular, women's occupational segregation in Sweden remains curiously impervious to change. Why? Have we come to the final analysis in which the structure of patriarchy emerges as the root of women's persistent inequality? Perhaps. But it should be kept in mind that Sweden, like most other advanced capitalist societies, has reached an impasse of sorts in the prevailing approaches to achieving social progress. A realignment is underway. We cannot say with any certainty what its future impact will be on the status of women until we can see more clearly the contours of emergent social alliances.


NOTES
1.
For detailed discussions of the events outlined here, see Martin ( 1975a), Coates ( 1975), and Crouch ( 1979).
2.
The following historical discussion is based largely on Davies ( 1975).
3.
Excluding women's entry to any job is now illegal under the Sex Discrimination Act, both explicitly and implicitly (in that the act recognizes indirect discrimination, which occurs when different training and experience requirements exclude women from certain jobs). However, the enforcement of the act has not been able to control the continued prac tice of exclusionary requirements.

-264-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Women's Movements of the United States and Western Europe: Consciousness, Political Opportunity, and Public Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 321

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.