Knowledge as Desire: An Essay on Freud and Piaget - Vol. 10

By Hans G. Furth | Go to book overview

All meaningful knowledge is for the sake of action, and all meaningful, action for the sake of friendship. Macmurray


Preface

WITH THIS ESSAY I reach a closure of sorts in the interpretation of Piaget's theory on which I have been working for over twentyfive years. Preliminary work along these lines appeared in the 1983 volumes of Human Development and New Ideas in Psychology.

My thanks to my colleagues at the Catholic University, where I found a congenial setting and challenging opportunities over these many years. From among the many with whom I interacted -- and this includes especially the large number of students who were exposed to my Piaget courses and seminars -- I'd like to mention by name Dan Dahlstrom, Paul Philibert, Bruce Ross, Jackie Smollar, Raymond Studzinski, Jim Youniss, and in addition John Broughton (at Columbia), Tom McCarthy(at Northwestern) and Jack Meacham (at Buffalo).

One person's work pervades the entire essay even though I make no explicit reference to it or mention the author's name. In 1953 and 1954 the Scottish philosopher John Macmurray presented the Gifford lectures at Edinburgh under the title of "The Form of the Personal." The lecture series was published in two small volumes entitled respectively "The Self as Agent" and

-vii-

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Knowledge as Desire: An Essay on Freud and Piaget - Vol. 10
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Knowledge As Desire - AN ESSAY ON FREUD AND PIAGET *
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • TO THE READER ix
  • 1 - Symbols: Where Freud and Piaget Meet 1
  • 2 - The Formation of the Symbolic World 15
  • 3 - The Formation of the Unconscious World 41
  • 4 - Libido Bound Through Symbols 65
  • Interlude: Preliminary Summary 93
  • 5 - Symbols: The Key to Humanization 101
  • 6 - Symbols, Biology, and Logical Necessity 121
  • 7 - Logic and Desire 153
  • References 173
  • Index 177
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