Knowledge as Desire: An Essay on Freud and Piaget - Vol. 10

By Hans G. Furth | Go to book overview

TO THE READER
THIS ESSAY HAS a few quite specific aims even though it covers a great variety of matters that can be treated in much greater detail within specific academic sub-disciplines. In order to help you not to lose sight of the overall direction it may be helpful to state the major objectives in the following points:
1. First, I elucidate Piaget's theory of object knowledge, specifically the developmental origin of theoretical knowledge in the transition from the object-of-action to the object-ofknowledge. As a consequence of object knowledge symbolic representation becomes psychologically available and developmentally comprehensible.
2. Second, I accept the main themes of Freud's theory as part of normal psychology and interpret them within Piaget's developmental framework. At the same time I point out that behind any symbol- and knowledge-formation (even the most "objective") there is ultimately an obligatory personal motivation of "I-want-my-object."
3. As a result of this synthesis Piaget's theory of knowledge is shown to be radically social and emotional, contrary

-ix-

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Knowledge as Desire: An Essay on Freud and Piaget - Vol. 10
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Knowledge As Desire - AN ESSAY ON FREUD AND PIAGET *
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • TO THE READER ix
  • 1 - Symbols: Where Freud and Piaget Meet 1
  • 2 - The Formation of the Symbolic World 15
  • 3 - The Formation of the Unconscious World 41
  • 4 - Libido Bound Through Symbols 65
  • Interlude: Preliminary Summary 93
  • 5 - Symbols: The Key to Humanization 101
  • 6 - Symbols, Biology, and Logical Necessity 121
  • 7 - Logic and Desire 153
  • References 173
  • Index 177
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