Knowledge as Desire: An Essay on Freud and Piaget - Vol. 10

By Hans G. Furth | Go to book overview

3.
The Formation of the Unconscious World

FREUD PUBLISHED HIS Interpretation of Dreams in 1900. It was, if not his first psychoanalytic work, certainly the first in which he engaged in extensive psychological theorizing ("metapsychology") on the basis of his psychoanalytic experience alone and discarded altogether any pretense of clothing his theoretical exposition in a neurological garb. The immediate occasion for this work was the death of Freud's father three years earlier, which brought about a period of intense emotional upheaval and Freud's disciplined resolve to get to the bottom of it. In order to achieve this self-imposed task, Freud started to interpret his own dreams; this enterprise turned out to be the world's first psychoanalytic treatment. Freud was forty-one years old at the time of his father's death, and forty-four when the book was published. The publication, reporting dark conflicting areas in the depth of the human soul, hardly caused a ripple in the complacent optimism of the pre-World War European intelligentsia. Was not science about to banish the last remnants of the dark forces of superstition and magic? The road to inevitable all-around betterment seemed wide

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Knowledge as Desire: An Essay on Freud and Piaget - Vol. 10
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Knowledge As Desire - AN ESSAY ON FREUD AND PIAGET *
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • TO THE READER ix
  • 1 - Symbols: Where Freud and Piaget Meet 1
  • 2 - The Formation of the Symbolic World 15
  • 3 - The Formation of the Unconscious World 41
  • 4 - Libido Bound Through Symbols 65
  • Interlude: Preliminary Summary 93
  • 5 - Symbols: The Key to Humanization 101
  • 6 - Symbols, Biology, and Logical Necessity 121
  • 7 - Logic and Desire 153
  • References 173
  • Index 177
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