Allenby, a Study in Greatness: The Biography of Field-Marshal Viscount Allenby of Megiddo and Felixstowe, G.C.B., G.C.M.G

By Archibald Wavell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
THE STAFF (1896-99)

I
THF STAFF COLLEGE (1896-97)

THE names of those who have successfully passed the course of the Staff College since its foundation in 1859 are inscribed on wooden panels in the central hall and principal passages of the building. On the panel which records those students who joined the college in January 1896 and passed out in December 1897 the names of Major E. H. H. Allenby, of the 6th Dragoons, and Captain D. Haig, of the 7th Hussars, stand next to each other.1

The careers and characters of these two men, who were the most famous commanders of British forces in the Great War, have many resemblances and some striking differences. They were practically of an age, Haig less than two months younger than Allenby; they were of similar stock and fortune, since each came of an old-established country family of good repute and comfortable circumstances, but of no particular eminence. Both lost their fathers early and owed much to their mothers for their upbringing. Neither was intended originally for a military career. Both had the essential qualities of greatness--

____________________
1
Haig, who had sat for the examination in 1893, but had failed in mathematics, received a nomination in 1895 and joined in 1896. Others in the same term who greatly distinguished themselves later were Sir Richard Haking (a corps commander in France), Sir Thompson Capper (who died of wounds received at Loos in command of a division), Sir George Macdonogh (head of the Intelligence branch in France and at the War Office during the War, and afterwards Adjutant-General), Sir William Furse (a divisional commander of the War and Master-General of Ordnance later), Sir George Forestier-Walker (a divisional commander of the War), and Sir James Edmonds (Deputy Engineer-in-Chief in France and now official military historian of the War).

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Allenby, a Study in Greatness: The Biography of Field-Marshal Viscount Allenby of Megiddo and Felixstowe, G.C.B., G.C.M.G
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.