Shabikeshchee Village: A Late Basket Maker Site in the Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

By Frank H. H. Roberts Jr. | Go to book overview

becomes one of great barren stretches, with only occasional cedars and piñons on the mesa tops, clumps of sagebrush, and rather scanty grass. The summers are very hot and dry and the winters cold.


THE CHACO CANYON

The Chaco Canyon bears an important relation to the San Juan region in that some of the finest examples of buildings of the great Pueblo period, Pueblo III, are to be found there. Not only is this true, but there is evidence to show that it was occupied for a long period of time, unquestionably from Basket Maker III through Pueblo I, II, and III. Even then its history was not completed, because during the tempestuous days of the Pueblo revolt, 1680 1696, it served as a place of refuge for some of the warring factions which were forced to flee from the avenging Spaniards. In more recent times it has become the home of small groups of Navaho Indians.

From a purely scenic standpoint the Chaco Canyon is not impressive and can not be compared with the Mesa Verde to the north or with the Kayenta country to the west. The canyon itself is quite narrow, at no point being a mile wide. Its walls are of red sandstone and the mesa tops on either side are almost barren. There are a few stunted cedar and piñon trees, some sagebrush, and scanty grass. Near its upper end, however, there are pines and the smaller trees are more numerous. In all directions the region is marked by shifting sand, great dry washes, deep arroyos, and a lack of vegetation. For one reason or another, however, this was a favored spot in the eyes of the early peoples, as is shown by the 11 large pueblo ruins and the almost countless numbers of small house sites scattered along its length.

-9-

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Shabikeshchee Village: A Late Basket Maker Site in the Chaco Canyon, New Mexico
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • SHABIK'ESHCHEE VILLAGE - A LATE BASKET MAKER SITE IN THE CHACO CANYON, NEW MEXICO 1
  • Introduction 2
  • SHABIK'ESHCHEE VILLAGE 10
  • Appendix - CATALOGUE NUMBER AND PROVENIENCE OF OBJECTS ILLUSTRATED 151
  • Bibliography 155
  • Index 159
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