Toward a Science of Human Nature: Essays on the Psychologies of Mill, Hegel, Wundt, and James

By Daniel N. Robinson | Go to book overview

BIOGRAPHICAL OUTLINES

John Stuart Mill (1806-1873)

Mill was born on May 20, 1806, in Pentonville, London. His Autobiography documents the interest James Mill took in his early education, which included the Latin and Greek classics and extensive study of British and world history. By the time he was eight years old, he had already begun to tutor his siblings. His serious studies of Aristotelian and Scholastic philosophy were undertaken in 1818, the year his father's History of India was published.

In 1820 and for about a year he stayed with the family of Sir Samuel Bentham in France, Sir Samuel being the brother of Jeremy. On his return to England and through his father's contacts he was able to read law with John Austin but, as always, not in a school but in his own home. Plans for a career in law were entertained but finally rejected and, in 1822, he began his employment with the India House, a term of employment that lasted decades.

It was at about the time of his first employment that Mill completed his reading of Bentham's Treatise on Legislation, a work that changed his life and numbered him immediately among the disciples of utilitarianism. Mill himself founded a Utilitarian Society as early as 1823, he then being seventeen! Within a year his career as a published author began with entries in the new and "radical" Westminister Review

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Toward a Science of Human Nature: Essays on the Psychologies of Mill, Hegel, Wundt, and James
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1. the Nineteenth Century 1
  • 2. John Stuart Mill 31
  • 3. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel 83
  • 4. Wilhelm Wundt 127
  • 5. William James 173
  • 6. the Nineteenth Century Revisited a Postscript 217
  • BIOGRAPHICAL OUTLINES 229
  • Notes 237
  • Index 253
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