The Divorce of Catherine of Aragon: The Story as Told by the Imperial Ambassadors Resident at the Court of Henry VIII

By J. A. Froude | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III.

Anxiety of the Pope to satisfy the King -- Fears of the Emperor -- Proposed alternatives -- France and England declare war in the Pope's defence -- Campeggio to be sent to England -- The King's account of the Pope's conduct -- The Pope's distress and alarm -- The secret decretal -- Instructions to Campeggio.

THE story returns to Orvieto. The dispensation was promised on condition that it should not be immediately acted on.1 Catherine having refused to acquiesce in a private arrangement, Wolsey again pressed the Pope for a commission to decide the cause in England, and to bind himself at the same time not to revoke it, but to confirm any judgment which he might himself give. "There were secret causes," he said, "which could not be committed to writing which made such a concession imperative: certain diseases in the Queen defying all remedy, for which, as for other causes, the King would never again live with her as his wife."

The Pope, smarting from ill-treatment and grateful for the help of France and England, professed himself earnestly anxious to do what Henry desired. But he was still virtually a prisoner. He had been obliged by the General of the Observants, when in St. Angelo, to promise to do nothing "whereby the King's divorce might be judged in his own dominions." He pleaded for time. He promised a commission of some kind, but he said he was undone if action was taken

____________________
1
Calendar, Foreign and Domestic, vol. iv. part 2, p. 1672

-62-

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The Divorce of Catherine of Aragon: The Story as Told by the Imperial Ambassadors Resident at the Court of Henry VIII
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • The Divorce of Catherine of Aragon 1
  • Chapter I 21
  • Chapter II 41
  • Chapter III. 62
  • Chapter IV. 70
  • Chapter V 86
  • Chapter VI 99
  • Chapter VII. 110
  • Chapter VIII. 131
  • Chapter IX. 141
  • Chapter X 157
  • Chapter XI 175
  • Chapter XII 192
  • Chapter XIII. 218
  • Chapter XIV. 243
  • Chapter XV. 260
  • Chapter XVI. 283
  • Chapter XVII. 301
  • Chapter XVIII 318
  • Chapter XIX 347
  • Chapter XX 371
  • Chapter XXI 389
  • Chapter XXII 412
  • Chapter XXIII 436
  • Chapter XXIV 450
  • Index 465
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