The Divorce of Catherine of Aragon: The Story as Told by the Imperial Ambassadors Resident at the Court of Henry VIII

By J. A. Froude | Go to book overview

been of advantage to the country. But he had failed miserably. He had drawn the King into a quarrel with his hereditary ally. He had entangled him, by ungrounded assurances, in a network of embarrassments, which had been made worse by the premature and indecent advancement of the Queen's intended successor. For this the Cardinal was not responsible. It was the King's own doing, and he had bitterly to pay for it. But Wolsey had misled his master into believing that there would be no difficulty. In the last critical moment he had not stood by him as the King had a right to expect; and, in the result, Henry found himself summoned to appear as a party before the Pope, the Pope himself being openly and confessedly a creature in the hands of the Emperor. No English sovereign had ever before been placed in a situation so degrading.

Parliament was to meet for other objects -- objects which could not be attained while Wolsey was in power and were themselves of incalculable consequence. But Anne Boleyn was an embarrassment, and Henry did for the moment hesitate whether it might not be better to abandon her. He had no desire to break the unity of Christendom or to disturb the peace of his own kingdom for the sake of a pretty woman. The Duke of Norfolk, though he was Anne's uncle, if he did not oppose her intended elevation, did nothing to encourage it. Her father, Lord Wiltshire, had been against it from the first. The Peers and the people would be the sufferers from a disputed succession, but they seemed willing to encounter the risk, or at least they showed no eagerness for the King's marriage with this particular person. If Reginald Pole is to be believed, the King did once inform the Council that he would go no further with it. The Emperor, to

-111-

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The Divorce of Catherine of Aragon: The Story as Told by the Imperial Ambassadors Resident at the Court of Henry VIII
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • The Divorce of Catherine of Aragon 1
  • Chapter I 21
  • Chapter II 41
  • Chapter III. 62
  • Chapter IV. 70
  • Chapter V 86
  • Chapter VI 99
  • Chapter VII. 110
  • Chapter VIII. 131
  • Chapter IX. 141
  • Chapter X 157
  • Chapter XI 175
  • Chapter XII 192
  • Chapter XIII. 218
  • Chapter XIV. 243
  • Chapter XV. 260
  • Chapter XVI. 283
  • Chapter XVII. 301
  • Chapter XVIII 318
  • Chapter XIX 347
  • Chapter XX 371
  • Chapter XXI 389
  • Chapter XXII 412
  • Chapter XXIII 436
  • Chapter XXIV 450
  • Index 465
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