Chinese Women through Chinese Eyes

By Li Yu-Ning | Go to book overview

Notes
1
This applies chiefly to widows of scholars and officials. These were not forbidden by law to remarry, and they were free to do so, if they dared defy the social convention. But the power of social convention was more tyrannical than the law.
2
In this section, the references to Yüan Mei's Sui-yuan ch'üan-chi (Collected works) are as follows: A -- Hsiao-ts'ang shall-fang wen-chi; B -- Hsiaots'ang shan-fang ch'ih-tu; C -- Sui-yüan shih-hua; D -- Sui-yüan sui-pi; E -- Tu-wai yü-yen.
3
A. Book 18, Second Letter in Reply to Hui Ting-yü ("I Doubt This Is Not What the Sages Prohibited").
4
A. Book 37, Letter in Reply to Wang Ta-shen; B. Book 4, Letter in Reply to a Certain Secretary; E. 4, 5, 21, 41.
5
B. Book 2, Letter to Subprefect Chang; for antivegetarianism, see A. Book 22, and his entire "Cook Book."
6
B. Book 1, Letter to Yüeh Shu-hsien.
7
B. Book 4, Letter in Reply to Lieutenant Governor T'ao Hui-hsien; B. Book 3, Letter in Reply to Provincial Graduate Chia Hui-hsiang.
8
B. Book 9, Letter to Chu Shih-chün; B. Book 7, Second Letter in Reply to Yang Li-hu; B. Book 8, Letter in Reply to P'eng Pen-yuan.
9
B. Book 10, Second Reply to Li Shao-ho; E. 16; A. Book 30, On Mr. Mao's Anthology of Writings by Eight Masters ( "One Needs No Rules in Writing").
10
A. Book 30, Letter in Reply to Chi-yuan on Poetry and History; A. Book 18, Preface to Ou-pai chi by Chao Yun-sung; B. Book 8, Letter in Reply to Li Shao-ho; A. Book 18, Letter in Reply to Shih Lan-t'o on Poetry and History.
11
See note 1. "The Six Confucian Classics are the progenitors of writings, just like the great grand ancestors of the people. The descendants naturally should listen to the words of their great grand ancestors, even though their ancestors' words are not all necessarily right, . . . nor all necessarily pure."
12
A. Book 17. Letter in Reply to Libationer Lei Ts'ui-t'ing on Behalf of Secretary P'an; particularly against Chu Hsi; B. Book 6, Letter in Reply to Shih Chung-ming; A. Book 24,4.
13
B. Book 8, Letter in Reply to the Supervisor of Imperial Instruction Yeh Shu-shan.
14
B. Book 7, Second Reply to Yeh Shu-shan.
15
E. 24.
16
See the most important essay "Ch'ing-shuo", A. Book 22.
17
C. Book 7,2.
18
B. Book 4, Letter in Reply to a Certain Secretary.
19
See note 16.
20
See note 18.

-57-

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