Chinese Women through Chinese Eyes

By Li Yu-Ning | Go to book overview

16
Scientific Entrepreneurship

Hung-ying

THE SOUND waves from the cries of "women's liberation" are almost enough to break the eardrums. However, since we have attained liberation, how should we go about putting this word into practice? It would be painfully distressing if, several thousand years of continued ironclad moral teachings for women having been overthrown, we would behave like birds who have escaped from their cages or horses without bridles, unable to avoid impulsive feelings and misunderstanding the true meaning of liberation. This would give the opponents of reform a good excuse. Liberation means demanding equal treatment with men, and so obviously genuine liberation means thoroughly fulfilling obligations the same as men. Men have occupations, and so women should also have occupations. At present, not many occupations have been opened up to us women; with the exception of a handful of jobs women are forced to take to avoid cold and hunger -- in textile mills, sock factories, silk mills, and so forth. Among the educated class, women can get a foothold only in hospitals, schools, and a small number of banks.

When I graduated from high school, friends urged me to go on to normal school. But because I felt that the dull and lonely life of a schoolteacher didn't suit my personality, I took the entrance examination for a sericulture school and passed. At that time I had already set myself the goal of managing my own business. Little did I know that after graduating I would feel bewildered because I couldn't find a job anywhere due to lack of experience and ability. Under the sponsorship of my alma mater, graduates

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