The Dream That Failed: Reflections on the Soviet Union

By Walter Laqueur | Go to book overview

6
Sovietology: An Epitaph (II)

The repentant sinner is one of the key figures in classical Russian literature from Raskolnikov and Alyosha Karamazov to Nekhlyudov (in Tolstoy's Resurrection). In the last quarter of the twentieth century repentant sinners have become rare in Russia. There were some exceedingly brave dissidents in the 1960s and 1970s who saved Russia's honor by resisting injustice and oppression; most of them suffered for the risk they took.

But it would be very difficult to find more than a handful of political figures or intellectuals who, having faithfully served the regime, were willing to admit any serious wrongdoing in later years. There was great reluctance to concede that they had been profoundly mistaken and knowingly or unknowingly served a cruel, repressive dictatorship. One can think of various reasons why the great majority did not become dissenters. At the beginning of their career most of them believed in the official ideology, albeit often with some reservations. In later years, when they gained a better understanding of the kind of society in which they lived, they had families and other commitments. To criticize the party and the government openly would have meant the end of their careers, suffering not only for themselves but their wives and children, and very likely arrest.

The number of heroes is sparsely sown at any time and in all countries. Nevertheless, one would have expected in later years a self-critical note, a mea culpa, even if not as extreme as that of Karamazov. But the time of admission of guilt, individual or collective, seems to have passed, and not only in Russia. Again, one can think of mitigating circumstances; many of the Russian liberals of the 1990s had been closet dissenters, even in Brezhnev's day, while paying lip service to the official ideology. It is also true that the revolution of 1988 to 1991 was largely their work, not that of the younger generation. The conservatives, in contrast, had nothing to be

-110-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Dream That Failed: Reflections on the Soviet Union
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents *
  • 1 - The Age of Enthusiasm 3
  • 2 - 1917: The Russia We Lost? 28
  • 3 - The Fall of the Soviet Union 50
  • 4 - Totalitarianism 77
  • 5 - Sovietology: An Epitaph (I) 96
  • 6 - Sovietology: An Epitaph (II) 110
  • 7 - How Many Victims? 131
  • 8 - The Nationalist Revival 147
  • 9 - East Germany: A Case Study 163
  • 10 - Conclusion 183
  • Notes 195
  • Index 227
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 231

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.