Future of Political Science

By Harold D. Lasswell | Go to book overview
the evaluations of outcome events as art. If we evaluated sculpture or music as instruments of power, wealth, or other values, the evaluation would be, not in terms of art, but of other events.In this developmental construct of politics and the arts, we must eventually consider many other historical and analytic factors. One of them is the demand to devalue power, especially in historical epochs in which the imperatives of power are pressing heavily on the lives of men. There are many ways of seeking to turn away from, or to reduce as far as possible, one's active commitment to power. Among these alternatives, one of the most successful contenders in the lives of many people is, and has long been, the aesthetic quest.In coming years, the rising level of education will prepare generations of advanced students to work effectively in cross-disciplinary fields, humanistic or scientific, that lie outside the specialized frame of political reference. It is probable that, as the division of intellectual labor opens and occupies interstitial and intersecting zones, the number of scholars who acquire "double competence" will increase. The permissive program of graduate training envisaged in the present discussion would cultivate both depth and diversity as means of professional development toward high levels of continuing creative achievement. It would become increasingly common for multidisciplinary collaboration to occur at successive stages of the professional career. In the following chapter, we deal explicitly with the prospects of collaborative activity in fields that are by tradition closely connected to the description, analysis, and management of politics.11
NOTES
Something of the flavor of Laski's personality shines through in the published correspondence with public figures, especially with Mr. Justice Holmes. Cf. Holmes-Laski Letters, "The Correspondence of Mr. Justice Holmes and Harold J. Laski, 1916-1935", Mark DeWolfe Howe , ed. ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1953).
Basic historical information is in M. J. L. O'Connor, Origins of Academic Economics in the United States( New York: Columbia University Press, 1944); A. Haddow, Political Science in American Colleges and Universities, " 1636- 1900" ( New York: Appleton-Century, 1939).
On this speed-up, it is possible to follow developments in The American Behavioral Scientist edited by A. deGrazia at Princeton. Cf. the special issue on "The New Educational Technology", 6 ( November 1962), No. 3. Among political scientists, Herbert Simon has been

-186-

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Future of Political Science
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - Political Science Today 1
  • Notes 26
  • 2 - Growth and Ambiguity 30
  • Notes 42
  • 3 - The Basic Data Survey (I) Intelligence, Promoting, Prescribing 43
  • Notes 65
  • 4 - The Basic Data Survey (II) Invoking, Applying, Appraising, Terminating 69
  • Notes 86
  • Appendix to Chapter 4 89
  • 5 - Experimentation, Prototyping, Intervention 95
  • Notes 120
  • 6 - Micromodeling 123
  • Notes 145
  • 7 - Cultivation of CreativitY (I) 147
  • Notes 163
  • 8 - Cultivation of Creativity (II) 167
  • Notes 186
  • 9 - Collaboration with Allied Professions 189
  • Notes 206
  • 10 - Centers for Advanced Political Science 208
  • Notes 234
  • 11 - Conclusion 239
  • Index 243
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