Future of Political Science

By Harold D. Lasswell | Go to book overview
tion has been mastered on all sides, so that lawyers, engineers, scientists, investors, and managers get on with the problem at hand with little skill-consciousness or misinterpretation. It is true that, as one moves away from the top levels of New York, Washington, and Cambridge, for example, the traditional stumbling blocks appear, and this is as true of the lower echelons in the East as anywhere else. In coming years, however, fuller advantage should be taken of improved means of sharing experience.The idea of centers of political science is to consolidate and improve the advances that have been made in integrating frames of reference among scholars and scientists and between them and the responsible decision-makers of government and other social institutions.
NOTES
1. The literature of controversy over the role of universities in America includes, e.g., R. M. Hutchins, The Higher Learning in America ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1936); and H. D. Gideonse, The Higher Learning in a Democracy, "A Reply to President Hutchins' Critique of the American University" ( New York: Farrar and Rinehart, 1937). An important interpretation of Education in the Forming of American Society is by B. Bailyn ( New York: Vintage Books, 1960). Approaches attempting to portray the educational system "as it is" include T. Caplow and P. J. McGee, The Academic Marketplace ( New York: Basic Books, 1958); and L. Wilson , The Academic Man ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1942). Cf. also R. Thomas, The Search for a Common Learning, General Education, 1800-1960 ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1962).
2. For insight into the traditional outlook of various civilizations, cf. D. S. Nivison and A. F. Wright, eds., Confucianism in Action ( Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1959); F. Rosenthal, trans., Ibn Khaldûn, The Muquaddimah, "An Introduction to History" ( London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1958); W. Barclay, Educational Ideals in the Ancient World ( London: Collins, 1959); W. Jaeger, Paideia, "The Ideals of Greek Culture", trans. G. Highet (2nd ed.; 3 vols.; New York: Oxford University Press, 1943); S. Radakrishnan and C. Moore, eds., A Source Book in Indian Philosophy ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1957).
3. A study of books and articles cited in advanced biological research showed that 50 per cent went no further back than five years; fewer than 10 per cent went back twenty years or more. Cf. P. Weiss, "Knowledge: A Growth Process", Science, 131 ( 1960), 1716- 1719.

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Future of Political Science
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - Political Science Today 1
  • Notes 26
  • 2 - Growth and Ambiguity 30
  • Notes 42
  • 3 - The Basic Data Survey (I) Intelligence, Promoting, Prescribing 43
  • Notes 65
  • 4 - The Basic Data Survey (II) Invoking, Applying, Appraising, Terminating 69
  • Notes 86
  • Appendix to Chapter 4 89
  • 5 - Experimentation, Prototyping, Intervention 95
  • Notes 120
  • 6 - Micromodeling 123
  • Notes 145
  • 7 - Cultivation of CreativitY (I) 147
  • Notes 163
  • 8 - Cultivation of Creativity (II) 167
  • Notes 186
  • 9 - Collaboration with Allied Professions 189
  • Notes 206
  • 10 - Centers for Advanced Political Science 208
  • Notes 234
  • 11 - Conclusion 239
  • Index 243
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