Future of Political Science

By Harold D. Lasswell | Go to book overview

11
Conclusion

The present inquiry comes at a time when great and accelerating changes multiply the problems that press on individuals and groups at every stage of national, international, and subnational life. There is obvious, pressing demand for the services of every person or profession believed competent to contribute to the solution of the vexing questions of public policy.

This discussion is addressed to all who concur in the fundamental importance of harmonizing our institutions with the requirements of human dignity and who recognize that the task calls for higher levels of performance by public and private agencies dealing with political intelligence and appraisal.

Explicitly, I am concerned with increasing the weight of factors that favor responsible freedom by giving more emphasis to the study of government. If the study of government is to make the impact of which it is capable, no government, no political party, and no private association can be allowed a monopoly on research, teaching, or con-

-239-

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Future of Political Science
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - Political Science Today 1
  • Notes 26
  • 2 - Growth and Ambiguity 30
  • Notes 42
  • 3 - The Basic Data Survey (I) Intelligence, Promoting, Prescribing 43
  • Notes 65
  • 4 - The Basic Data Survey (II) Invoking, Applying, Appraising, Terminating 69
  • Notes 86
  • Appendix to Chapter 4 89
  • 5 - Experimentation, Prototyping, Intervention 95
  • Notes 120
  • 6 - Micromodeling 123
  • Notes 145
  • 7 - Cultivation of CreativitY (I) 147
  • Notes 163
  • 8 - Cultivation of Creativity (II) 167
  • Notes 186
  • 9 - Collaboration with Allied Professions 189
  • Notes 206
  • 10 - Centers for Advanced Political Science 208
  • Notes 234
  • 11 - Conclusion 239
  • Index 243
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