Natural Selection: Domains, Levels, and Challenges

By George C. Williams | Go to book overview

10
Other challenges and anomalies

In my view the various examples of stasis, some discussed in Chapter 9, form the most serious set of difficulties facing evolutionary theory today. In this chapter I try to continue in the spirit of Darwin's Chapters 6 and 7, and my own Chapters 8 and 9, and discuss various other theoretical challenges. Other investigators can undoubtedly identify major anomalies that I have overlooked. To these might be added an enormous list of single investigations that yielded results somewhat different from what had been expected. Some of these might well be of enormous importance, given the proper interpretation. The finding of mitotic irregularities and unexpected pigment patterns in maize leaves and kernels might have been shrugged off by many geneticists as a minor technical annoyance. Happily McClintock ( 1965, 1987) did more than shrug. She took the trouble to keep detailed records of the annoyances through successive generations and thereby discovered the previously unsuspected transposable elements.


10.1 Haldane's dilemma

Twenty years ago this was a much debated matter. Discussions began with J. B. S. Haldane's ( 1937, 1957) calling attention to the seemingly great demographic cost of natural selection, gained greater attention with the growing recognition of high levels of genetic variability in nature (history reviewed by Ayala ( 1982)), reached a high prominence with a decisive demonstration of this phenomenon ( Lewontin and Hubby 1966), and climaxed in Bruce Wallace's ( 1970) book Genetic Load (updated by Wallace ( 1987, 1989) and Reeve et al. 1988). A formally rather similar problem is currently worrying investigators of the evolution of developmental mechanisms ( Kauffman 1987; Wimsatt and Schank 1988).

In my opinion the problem was never solved, by Wallace or anyone else. It merely faded away, because people got interested in other things.

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Natural Selection: Domains, Levels, and Challenges
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - A philosophical position 3
  • 2 - The gene as a unit of selection 10
  • 3 - Clade selection and macroevolution 23
  • 4 - Levels of selection among interactors 38
  • 5 - Optimization and related concepts 56
  • 6 - Historicity and constraint 72
  • 7 - Diversity within and among populations 89
  • 8 - Some recent issues 106
  • 9 - Stasis 127
  • 10 - Other challenges and anomalies 143
  • References 154
  • Appendix: Excerpts from some classic works on adaptation 190
  • Index 203
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 208

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.