Working at Play: A History of Vacations in the United States

By Cindy S. Aron | Go to book overview

9
"It's worthwhile to get something from your holiddy" VACATIONING DURING the DEPRESSION

The depression would seem an inhospitable climate for vacations. The economy was in a shambles. Millions of Americans were out of work. Many of those lucky enough to keep their jobs saw significant reductions in their hours. From an average fifty-hour work week in 1929, the number dropped to below thirty-five by 1935 as the depression created a crisis of unemployment, overproduction, and underconsumption. 1 People worried not about taking more time off from work, but about finding enough work to guarantee support for themselves and their families.

Given these conditions, a few voices argued for the suspension of anything as frivolous as vacationing. In August of 1931 the Literary Digest, for example, ran an article called "Should Ministers Have a Vacation?" Those who answered "no" pointed to the problems caused by the depression -- "lack of work, despondency, and all that goes with discouragement of this kind." During such times ministers needed to give their complete attention to parishioners: "Can one imagine Christ taking a vacation in the midst of such despondency and discouragement as we have now?" Others defended the traditional practice of granting ministers a two- to four-week vacation. Pointing to the wide range of important functions beyond "sermon-preach-

-237-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Working at Play: A History of Vacations in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved in your active project from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 324

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.