Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

different from the Catholic religion may have been permitted in some provinces or towns of our kingdom, with respect to which regulations shall continue to be carried out.

Source: [A. J. L.] Jourdan, [F. A.] Isambert, Decrusy (eds.), Recueil général des anciennes lois françaises, depuis l'an 420 jusqu'à la révolution de 1789 ( Paris, 1822-1833), XXVIII, 472-482.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

G. Adams, The Huguenots and French Opinion, 1685-1787: the Enlightenment Debate on Toleration ( Waterloo, Ont., 1991), pp. 295-306.

G. Bonet-Maury, Histoire de la liberté de conscience en France depuis l'Édit de Nantes jusqu'à juillet 1870 ( Paris, 1900), pp. 36-87.

R. C. Poland, French Protestantism, and the French Revolution, 1684-1815 ( Princeton, 1957), pp. 27-82.


The English Church

4
Toleration Act (Extracts) April 18, 1689

After the Glorious Revolution in 1688, statutory relief for Dissenters, most of whom had sympathized with the movement against James II, could not be denied. The major issue in revising the Restoration religious settlement was whether to enact toleration or "comprehension," the latter being the inclusion of moderate Dissenters -- practically, Presbyterians -- within an enlarged state church. A Comprehension Bill failed in the Commons in 1689, but the Toleration Bill, granting limited privileges to non-Anglican but Trinitarian Protestants, passed.

FORASMUCH as some Ease to scrupulous Consciences in the Exercise of Religion may be an effectual Means to unite Their Majesties Protestant Subjects in Interest and Affection:

II. Be it enacted . . . That neither the Statute made in the three and twentieth Year of . . . Elizabeth, intituled, An Act to retain the Queen's Majesty's Subjects in their due Obedience; nor the Statute made in the twenty-ninth Year of the said Queen, intituled, An Act for the more speedy and due Execution of certain Branches of the Statute made in the three and twentieth Year of the Queen's Majesty's Reign, viz. the aforesaid Act; nor that Branch or Clause of a Statute made in the first Year of . . . the said Queen, intituled, An Act for the Uniformity of Common Prayer . . .; whereby all Persons, having no lawful or reasonable Excuse to be absent, are required to resort to their Parish Church . . .; nor the Statute made in the third

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