Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

be excluded without delay, an exclusion of which we give the liberty and power to the said Ministers.

* * *

13. . . . . We shall. . . . pay particular attention . . . to the well-being of the Ministers and Preachers who have fulfilled their duties; and . . . we hereby renew the edict . . . exempting their sons from military service; and we ordain that . . . all the sons of Ecclesiastics . . . as well as the sons of the Public Instructors of Youth . . . be comprised in this exemption, if they are devoted to the sciences, the arts, drawing, or commerce; but those who prefer a trade, or any other profession, or who have studied without success shall be excluded from the privilege; and in that respect we shall give the necessary orders to our regiments for their service . . . .

Source: L. P. Ségur, History of the Principal Events of the Reign of Frederic William II ( London, 1801), I, 437-450. German text in Publicationen aus den königlichen Preussischen Staatsarchiven, LIII, 250-257.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

Cambridge Modern History ( New York, 1903- 1912), VI, 702-728.

G. S. Ford, "Wöllner and the Prussian Religious Edict of 1788", American Historical Review, Vol. XV, No. 2 ( January 1910), pp. 264-280, and No. 3 ( April 1910), pp. 509-525.

F. H. Geffcken, Church and State ( London, 1877), II, 23-33.

K. D. Macmillan, Protestantism in Germany ( Princeton, 1917), pp. 148-163.

L. Tümpel, Die Entstehung des brandenburgisch-preussischen Einheitsstaates im Zeitalter des Absolutismus, 1609-1806 ( Berlin, 1915), pp. 223-239.


The American Experiment

12
Early Virginia Legislation 1606-1643

Until the Revolution, the colonies of the South were all to maintain Anglicanism as a state religion. The Virginia church, earliest and strongest of these southern Establishments, was organized as a matter of course by the first authorities, who, unlike some later English settlers, had conventional English views of church-state relations. Religion did not dominate the Virginia enterprise as it did the New England colonies and Pennsylvania, but a religious concern was evident in the decrees of the London Company, led by the Puritan sympathizer, Sir Edwin Sandys,

-34-

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