Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

improve his civil authority for the observing of the duties commanded in the first, as well as for observing of the duties commanded in the second table. They are called Gods. The end of the Magistrates office, is not only the quiet & peaceable life of the subject, in matters of righteousness & honesty, but also in matters of godliness, yea of all godliness. . . .

7. The object of the powr of the Magistrate, are not things meerly inward, & so not subject to his cognisance & view, as unbeleife hardness of heart, erronious opinions not vented; but only such things as are acted by the outward man; neither is their powr to be exercised, in commanding such acts of the outward man, & punishing the neglect therof, as are but meer inventions, & devices of men; but about such acts, as are commanded & forbidden in the word; yea such as the word doth clearly determine . . . .

8. Idolatry, Blasphemy, Heresy, venting corrupt & pernicious opinions, that destroy the foundation, open contempt of the word preached, prophanation of the Lords day, disturbing the peaceable administration & exercise of the worship & holy things of God, & the like, are to be restrayned, & punished by civil authority.

9. If any church one or more shall grow schismaticall, rending it self from the communion of other churches, or shall walke incorrigibly or obstinately in any corrupt way of their own, contrary to the rule of the word; in such case, the Magistrate is to put forth his coercive powr, as the matter shall require. . . .

Source: Williston Walker, The Creeds and Platforms of Congregationalism ( New York, 1893), pp. 220, 221, 228, 233, 234-237.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

Source for this document, pp. 157-188.

References for Document 13.


15
Maryland Toleration Act (Extracts) April 21, 1649

English Catholicism secured an American foothold through the efforts of the Stuart courtier and secretary, George Calvert (d. 1632), and his son, Cecilius ( 1605-1675). Under the latter the settling of the Chesapeake colony began in 1634. In addition to the charter requirement, various factors combined to influence the Maryland experiment in religious equality. Religious contention was personally distasteful to the proprietors. English government, Anglican and -- after 1640 -- increasingly Puritan, was watchful over the proprietorship. Maryland itself was settled primarily by Protestants; English Catholicism was too small, conservative, and aristocratic to send emigrants in significant numbers. The policy of mutual religious forbearance was practiced from the beginning, but given statutory basis by this act of the Maryland Assembly in 1649

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