Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

R. M. Jones, The Quakers in the American Colonies ( New York, 1911), pp. 215-241.

A. P. Stokes, Church and State in the United States ( New York, 1950), I, 166-167.

F. J. Zwierlein, Religion in New Netherlands ( Rochester, N.Y., 1910), pp. 213-246.


17
Rhode Island Charter (Extract) July 8, 1663

Puritan radicals, many of them outcasts from Massachusetts Bay, settled the Narragansett region. Some of them, like Roger Williams and some Baptists, were prompted by the dichotomy of nature and grace in Puritan thought to embrace a radical disjunction of the two realms in practice. Others, extreme Spiritists such as Anne Hutchinson's Antinomians and the followers of Samuel Gorton, disbelieved in the relevance of earthly helps to the Spirit's work in the world. In either case the result was a separation of church and state. Furthermore, this course was a practical necessity in view of the wide religious diversity of Rhode Island. Because of the irregular origin and settlement of the Narragansett country, none of the four towns that later joined to form the colony -- Providence, Portsmouth, Newport, or Warwick -- had any legal foundation for itself or security for its institutions. When neighboring colonies, distrustful of Rhode Island's religious experimentation and political disorder, threatened conquest, some colonial leaders, notably Williams, sought to reduce vulnerability by securing an English charter. Williams obtained a parliamentary charter in 1644, confirmed by Cromwell in 1655. Another charter, which explicitly preserved religious liberty, was secured by John Clarke from Charles II ( 1660-1685) in 1663. It served the colony for 180 years.

Whereas wee have been informed, by the humble petition of our trustie and well beloved subject, John Clarke, on the behalf of Benjamine Arnold, William Brenton, William Coddington, . . . and the rest of the purchasers and ffree inhabitants of our island, called Rhode-Island, and the rest of the colonie of Providence Plantations . . . that they, pursueing, with peaceable and loyall mindes, their sober, serious and religious intentions, of godlie edifieing themselves, and one another, in the holie Christian ffaith and worshipp as they were perswaded; together with the gaineing over and conversione of the poore ignorant Indian natives . . . to the sincere professione and obedienc of the same ffaith and worship, did, not onlie . . . transport themselves out of this kingdome of England into America, but alsoe, since their arrivall there, after their first settlement amongst other our subjects in those parts, ffor the avoideing of discorde, and those manie evills which were likely to ensue upon some of those oure subjects not beinge able to beare . . . theire different apprehensiones in religious concernements . . . did once againe leave theire desireable stationes and habitationes, and with excessive labour and travell,

-50-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.