Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

other Western states repeated or approximated this terminology at the time of their admission.


From Article VIII, Section 3:

That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their conscience; that no human authority can, in any case whatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience; that no man shall be compelled to attend, erect, or support any place of worship, or to maintain any ministry, against his consent; and that no preference shall ever be given by law to any religious society or mode of worship, and no religious test shall be required, as a qualification to any office of trust or profit. But religion, morality, and knowledge being essentially necessary to the good government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of instruction shall forever be encouraged by legislative provision, not inconsistent with the rights of conscience.

Source: Francis Newton Thorpe (ed.), The Federal and State Constitutions ( Washington, D.C., 1909), V, 2910.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

E. S. Gaustad, Faith of Our Fathers. Religion and the New Nation ( San Francisco, 1987), pp. 151 ff.

A. P. Stokes, Church and State in the United States ( New York, 1950), I, 480-482, 613- 614.

C. Wittke (ed.), The History of the State of Ohio ( Columbus, Ohio, 1941- 1944), II, 3-31.


Diversity and Establishment in the Canadas

26
The Quebec Act (Extracts) June 22, 1774

Unlike the United States, Canada's historical evolution produced no constitutional tradition of church-state separation, although British North America exhibited growing religious diversity by the end of the eighteenth century. The Church of England was officially (though weakly) established in the maritime colonies ( Nova Scotia 1758, New Brunswick 1786, Prince Edward Island 1803), and after the American Revolution an influx of colonial Loyalists and British immigrants laid the foundations of a predominantly Protestant Upper Canada. Protestants

-67-

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