Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

to disclose and make known to His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, all Treasons and traiterous Conspiracies and Attempts which I shall know to be against him, or any of them; and all this I do swear without any Equivocation, mental Evasion or secret Reservation, and renouncing all Pardons and Dispensations from any Power or Person whomsoever to the contrary.

So help me GOD.

* * *

VIII. . . . all His Majesty's Canadian Subjects, within the Province of Quebec, the religious Orders and Communities only excepted, may also hold and enjoy their Property and Possessions, together with all Customs and Usages relative thereto, and all other their Civil Rights, in as large, ample and beneficial manner as if the said Proclamation, Commissions, Ordinances, and other Acts and Instruments had not been made, and as may consist with their Allegiance to His Majesty and Subjection to the Crown and Parliament of Great Britain; and that in all Matters of Controversy relative to Property and Civil Rights, Resort shall be had to the Laws of Canada, as the Rule for the Decision of the same; and all Causes that shall hereafter be instituted in any of the Courts of Justice . . . shall, with respect to such Property and Rights, be determined agreeably to the said Laws and Customs of Canada, until they shall be varied or altered by any Ordinances that shall, from time to time, be passed in the said Province by the Governor, Lieutenant Governor or Commander in Chief for the time being, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Legislative Council of the same. . . .

Source: 14 Geo. III, c. 83; The Statutes at Large, of England and of Great-Britain ( London, 1811), XIII, 791-792.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

R. Coupland, The Quebec Act. A Study in Statesmanship ( Oxford, 1925).

J. S. Moir, The Church in the British Era. From the British Conquest to Confederation ( Toronto, 1972), pp. 35-47.

H. Neatby, Quebec. The Revolutionary Age 1760-1791 ( Toronto, 1966), pp. 125-141.


27
Canadian Constitutional Act (Extracts) June 10, 1791

After the American Revolution many discontented Loyalists emigrated to the British maritime colonies, to British territories adjacent to the Great Lakes (Upper Canada), and even to the predominantly Frenchlanguage Lower Canada. In recognition of this new pattern of settlement, Parliament amended the Quebec Act, dividing the Province into Upper and Lower Canada and granting demands for common law, freehold tenure, and legislative assembly. At the same time it also explicitly established and endowed "the Protestant Clergy", that is, the Church of

-69-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.