Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

Decree of February 21, 1795 (3 Ventôse, Year III):
1. In conformity with article 7 of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and with article 122 of the constitution [of the Year 1], the practice of any cult may not be disturbed.
2. The Republic funds none of them.
3. It does not provide any premises, either for the practice of worship or the lodging of ministers.
4. The ceremonies of every worship are forbidden outside of the precincts chosen for their practice.
5. The law does not recognize any minister of religion; no one may appear in public with garments, ornaments or costumes set apart for religious ceremonies.
6. Every gathering of citizens for the practice of any worship whatsoever is subject to the surveillance of the constituted authorities. That surveillance is confined to measures of police and public security.
7. No symbol peculiar to a religion of any kind may be placed in or on the outside of a public place. No inscription may identify the place which is dedicated to [religion]. No proclamation or public summons may be made in order to call the citizens there.
8. The communes or communal sections in collective name shall not acquire nor lease buildings for the practice of religions.
9. No perpetual or life annuity may be formed nor any tax established to discharge their expenses.
10. Whosoever shall violently disturb ceremonies of any religion whatsoever or abuse the objects of it shall be punished according to the law of 19-22 July, 1791. . . .

From the Constitution of the Year III:

354. No one, while conforming to the law, may be prevented from practicing his chosen religion.

No one may be forced to contribute to the expenses of a sect. The Republic pays none of them.

Source: Jean B. Duvergier (ed.), Collection complète des lois, décrets, ordonnances, règlements, avis du conseil d'état ( Paris, 1834- 1906), VIII, 25-26; ibid., 240-241.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

A. Mathiez, After Robespierre. The Thermidorian Reaction ( New York, 1931), pp. 137- 155.

References for Documents 28 and 35.

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.