Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

Extraordinary, under the same pretext, and the Constitution which they tumultuously made, abolished this Tribunal to the regret of the nation.

Wherefore the re-establishment of this Tribunal has been earnestly entreated of me; and acceding to the prayers and desires of the people, . . . I have resolved that the Council of the Inquisition and the other Tribunals of the Holy Office should return to and continue in the exercise of their jurisdiction, both the ecclesiastic, . . . and that royal jurisdiction which has been granted by kings, observing, in the exercise both of the one and of the other, the laws which were in force in 1808 and the laws and acts which, in order to avoid certain abuses and to moderate some privileges, it was thought necessary to make at different times.

But, moreover, in addition to these provisions, it may be necessary perhaps to establish others; and . . . I am desirous that, as soon as the Council of Inquisition is assembled, two of its individuals with two members of my royal council, all of them to be named by myself, should examine the form and mode of proceeding of the Holy Office in the causes which are brought before it, and the established mode of censuring and prohibiting books; and if in those forms I should find anything . . . which ought to be changed, they may propose it, and consult with me, that I may order that which is proper.

Source: British and Foreign State Papers ( 1812- 1814) ( London, 1841), 1, 1102-1104.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

W. J. Callahan, Church, Politics and Society in Spain 1750-1874 ( Cambridge, Mass., 1984), pp. 110 ff.

P. B. Gams, Die Kirchengeschichte von Spanien ( Regensburg, 1862- 1879), III, No. 2, 427 ff.

H. C. Lea, A History of the Inquisition in Spain ( New York, 1906- 1907), IV, 420-433.


48
Sollicitudo Omnium Ecclesiarum (Extract) August 7, 1814

After dissolution of the order in 1773, Pius VII ( 1800-1823) approved the Jesuits in the Russian Empire in 1801 and Naples in 1804. One of his first acts after returning to Rome in May 1814 was to restore the order entirely, despite formal protests from some of the powers.

The catholic world demands, with unanimous voice, the re-establishment of the company of Jesus. We daily receive to this effect the most pressing petitions from our venerable brethren, the archbishops and bishops, and the most distinguished persons, especially since the abundant fruits which this company has produced . . . have been generally known. . . .

We should deem ourselves guilty of a great crime towards God, if, amidst these dangers of the christian republic, we neglected the aids which the special Providence of God has put at our disposal; and if, placed in the bark of Peter, tossed and assailed by continual storms, we refused to employ the vigorous and experienced

-120-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.