Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

opinion, speech, and freedom of conscience. He prays that everything will be favorable and happy for the soldiers who will fight to free liberty from tyranny, and he encourages groups and associations in the furious combat which engulfs everything. . . .

. . . Especially dangerous is the fact that holy Scriptures that have been tainted with the errors of this author are disseminated to the unwary. Acting as if he were sent and inspired by God, he speaks in the name of the Trinity and then uses Scriptures as a pretext for releasing people from the law of obedience. He twists the words of holy Scripture in a bold and cunning manner in order to firmly establish his depraved ravings. . . .

. . . By Our apostolic power, We condemn the book: . . . We decree that it be perpetually condemned. It corrupts the people by a wicked abuse of the word of God, to dissolve the bonds of all public order and to weaken all authority. It arouses, fosters, and strengthens seditions, riots, and rebellions . . .

Source: Claudia Carlen (ed.), The Papal Encyclicals 1740-1878 ( Ann Arbor, Mich., 1990), pp. 249-250. Latin text in Acta Gregorii Papae XVI ( Rome, 1901), 1, 433-434.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

References for Documents 54 and 55.


The Roman Revolution of 1848

57
Fundamental Statute for the Temporal Government of the States of the Church (Extracts) March 14, 1848

At the time of his election Pius IX ( 1846-1878) was popular, comparatively young, and more inclined to experiment and reform than his predecessor. Popular enthusiasm mounted for a pontiff who granted a political amnesty, relaxed censorship, permitted a civil guard, consulted lay counsellors, and was believed sympathetic to national unification if the independence and sovereignty of the papacy could be safeguarded. Risings in other Italian states and the Paris revolt of 1848 led to expectations and demands in Rome that the Curia hesitantly and cautiously attempted to satisfy in this constitution.


General Provisions

I. The Sacred College of Cardinals, the electors of the Supreme Pontiff, forms a senate inseparable from him.

-141-

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