Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

Source: John Keble, Sermons Academical and Occasional ( Oxford, 1847), pp. 127-128, 133-141.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

G. Battiscombe, John Keble ( London, 1963).

Y. Brillioth, The Anglican Revival ( London, 1933).

O. J. Brose, Church and Parliament: The Reshaping of the Church of England, 1828-1860 ( Stanford, 1939).

S. C. Carpenter, Church and People, 1789-1889 ( London, 1933), pp. 146-174.

R. W. Church, The Oxford Movement: Twelve Years, 1833-1845 ( London, 1891).

C. P. S. Clarke, The Oxford Movement and After ( London, 1932).

G. C. Faber, The Oxford Apostles ( London, 1933).

H. J. Laski, Studies in the Problem of Sovereignty ( New Haven, 1917), pp. 69-120.

G. I. T. Machin, Politics and the Churches in Great Britain, 1832-1868 ( Oxford, 1977), pp. 75-91.


84
Tract I September 9, 1833

The extension of the movement beyond the university community was largely the work of the Tracts for the Times, "by members of the University of Oxford." This enterprise, planned in the summer of 1833, was designed to awaken Anglicanism to its historic Catholic faith and rally its defenders by means of brief, pointed messages contained in penny tracts. Between the first issue in September and the end of the year, twenty tracts, the first three by John Henry Newman ( 1801-1890), had been printed and widely distributed. They produced sensation and controversy at Oxford and throughout the country. Tract I was Newman's impassioned summons to the clergy to stand on "our apostolical descent."


Thoughts on the Ministerial Commission. Respectfully Addressed to the Clergy.

I am but one of yourselves, -- a Presbyter; and therefore I conceal my name, lest I should take too much on myself by speaking in my own person. Yet speak I must; for the times are very evil, yet no one speaks against them.

Is not this so? Do not we "look one upon another," yet perform nothing? Do we not all confess the peril into which the Church is come, yet sit still each in his own retirement, as if mountains and seas cut off brother from brother? Therefore suffer me, while I try to draw you forth from those pleasant retreats, which it has been our blessedness hitherto to enjoy, to contemplate the condition and prospects of our Holy Mother in a practical way; so that one and all may unlearn that idle habit,

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.