Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

highest, purest, most churchly of these deeds is rescuing love. If in this sense the word of the Inner Mission is accepted, then our church's promised day has dawned. Evangelical preachers must first gather together and do penance for all that has been neglected in this area. Through their repentance they must move the whole community to repentance. Indeed, is there anyone who could or would dare to refrain from repentance? Let us all humble ourselves before the Lord! Here is an accumulated guilt not of one but of all, a guilt not simply of this generation, but an inherited guilt from the centuries which now must be atoned for in this new dawning age of the world. This repentance would mark the division between the old and new ages in our church, and the new age and its harvest would be more glorious than the old with its conclusion. Because all who come out of repentance will rise up in faith to the great task of saving the people from sin and wretchedness through Christ's power and glory. . . . "

Source: Johann Hinrich Wichern, Ausgewählte Schriften (ed. Karl Janssen) (Gôtersloh, Germany, 1958), I, 112, 114-116, 117, 121-122, 123-124.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

G. Brakelmann, Kirche und Sozialismus im 19. Jahrhundert ( Witten, Germany, 1966), pp. 15-109.

A. L. Drummond, German Protestantism since Luther ( London, 1951), pp. 214-229.

M. Gerhardt, Ein Jahrhundert Innere Mission. Die Geschichte des Central-Ausschusses für die Innere Mission der deutschen evangelischen Kirche (Gôteresloh, Germany, 1948).

_____, Johann Hinrich Wichern. Ein Lebensbild ( Hamburg, 1927- 1931).

K. S. Latourette, Christianity in a Revolutionary Age ( New York, 1958- 1962), II, 102-109.

F. J. Leenhardt, La Mission interieure et sociale de l'église d'aprés Wichern ( Paris, 1931).

P. Schaff, Germany: Its Universities, Theology, and Religion ( Philadelphia, 1857), pp. 405- 418.

W. O. Shanahan, German Protestants Face the Social Question (Notre Dame, 1954).


93
Fudamental Rights of the German People (Extract) March 28, 1849

The Frankfurt Assembly, the congress of German liberals made possible by the revolutionary upheaval, sought national unification and political freedom. Because the state churches were normally supports of autocracy, German liberalism had few vital links with official Protestantism, and the constitutional program of separation was regarded by the Evangelical churches as an attack. By. contrast, Catholics, following the Belgian example, found some common ground with liberals in demands for freedom of press, association, and education. These Fundamental Rights were first proclaimed in December 1848 and finally placed in the Constitution of March 29, 1849, as Section VI. Religion was dealt with

-237-

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