Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

Lutheranism as the national church rather than as a mere state Establishment. The promises of a new church constitution and an act for dissenters were not fulfilled, but in practice religious liberty was respected. 3. The Evangelical Lutheran Church is the National Church, and as such to be supported by the state.

* * *

6. The king must belong to the Evangelical Lutheran Church.

* * *

80. The state [constitution] of the National Church is to be regulated by law.

81. The citizens possess the right of forming communions to worship God in whatsoever way their convictions guide them, provided that nothing is taught or done contrary to morality or the public peace.

82. No person is bound to contribute personally to any other religious worship than his own. Everybody, however, who does not prove to be a member of one of the established creeds in the country, must pay to the school fund the tax established by law for the benefit of the National Church.

83. The relations of those religious denominations that differ from the National Church are to be regulated by law.

84. No one on account of his religious beliefs may be debarred access to the entire enjoyment of civil and political rights nor . . . escape the performance of any general obligation of a citizen.

Source: The Constitution or Fundamental Law for the Kingdom of Denmark as Passed by the United Diet on the 25th Day of May 1849 Approved and Sanctioned by His Majesty Frederic the Seventh June 5th 1849 (St. Croix, Christiansted, n.d.), pp. 2, 14-15.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

Cambridge Modern History ( New York, 1903- 1912), XI, 691-696.

J. Danstrup, A History of Denmark ( Copenhagen, 1948), pp. 94-124.

C. Goos and H. Hansen, Das Staatsrecht des Königreichs Dänemark ( Tübingen, Germany, 1913), pp. 38-41.

H. Koch and B. Kornerup, Den Danske Kirkes Historie ( Copenhagen, 1950- 1958), VI, 351-361; VII, 1-33.

K. S. Latourette, Christianity in a Revolutionary Age ( New York, 1958- 1962), II, 149-150.

A. Nyholm, Religion og Politik en Monrad Studie ( Copenhagen, 1947).

-239-

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