Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview
persons in holy orders, or shall remove any obligation to enter into holy orders which is by such authority attached to any such office.
(2.) Nothing in this section shall open any office (not being an office mentioned in this section) to any person who is not a member of the Church of England, where such office is at the passing of this Act confined to members of the said Church by reason of any such degree as aforesaid being a qualification for holding that office.

4. Nothing in this Act shall . . . affect. . . . otherwise than is hereby expressly enacted, the system of religious instruction, worship, and discipline which now is . . . lawfully established in the said universities. . . .

5. The governing body of every college. . . . shall provide sufficient religious instruction for all members thereof in statu pupillari belonging to the Established Church.

6. The Morning and Evening Prayer according to the Order of the Book of Common Prayer shall continue to be used daily as heretofore in the chapel of every college. . . .

7. No person shall be required to attend any college or university lecture to which he, if he be of full age, or, if he be not of full age, his parent or guardian, shall object upon religious grounds.

Source: 34 Vict., c. 26; The Public General Statutes Passed in the Thirty-Fourth & Thirty- Fifth Years of the Reign of Her Majesty Queen Victoria, 1871 ( London, 1871), pp. 191-193.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

J. W. Adamson, English Education 1789-1902( Cambridge, 1930), pp. 415-418.

W. G. Addison, Religious Equality in Modern England, 1714-1914 ( London, 1944), pp. 141-144.

S. C. Carpenter, Church and People, 1789-1889( London, 1933), pp. 359-365.

L. E. Elliott-Binns, Religion in the Victorian Era ( London, 1936), 319-325.

D. A. Winstanley, Later Victorian Cambridge ( Cambridge, 1947), pp. 36-90.


The Papacy and Italian Unification

102
Law of Papal Guarantees May 13, 1871

Taking advantage of the Franco-Prussian War and the withdrawal of the french garrison at Rome, Italian troops forced their way into the city on September 22, 1870, and the subsequent annexation, approved by plebiscite in October, established the Roman Question as a major issue in Italian and European politics. Though Pius excommunicated the "usurpers," refused to surrender the Quirinal, and called international

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