Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview
14. 14. For the gradual and reasonable reduction of the hours of labor to the lowest practicable point, and for that degree of leisure for all which is a condition of the highest human life.
15. 15. For a living wage as a minimum in every industry, and for the highest wage that each industry can afford.
16. 16. For a new emphasis upon the application of Christian principles to the acquisition and use of property, and for the most equitable division of the product of industry that can ultimately be devised.

Source: The Outlook, December 21, 1912, p. 851.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

A. I. Abell, The Urban Impact on American Protestantism 1865- 1900 ( New York, 1962).

J. Dombrowski, The Early Days of Christian Socialism in America ( New York, 1936).

C. H. Hopkins, The Rise of the Social Gospel in American Protestantism, 1865- 1915 ( New Haven, 1940).

H. F. May, Protestant Churches and Industrial America ( New York, 1949).

D. B. Meyer, The Protestant Search for Political Realism, 1919- 1941 ( Berkeley, 1960).

R. M. Miller, American Protestantism and Social Issues, 1919- 1939 ( Chapel Hill, N.C., 1958).

E. B. Sanford, Origin and History of the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America ( Hartford, Conn., 1916).


126
Mexican Constitution of 1917 (Extracts) January 31, 1917

In the second half of the nineteenth century, church and state conflicts became common in Latin America, where the clergy were identified with the conservative landed classes in resisting agrarian and political reconstruction in the interests of the impoverished peasantry an Indians. In Mexico the anticlerical tradition, born in ecclesiastical opposition to the national struggle against Spain, matured in the Juarez program of the 1850s, which indicted the landed wealth and political and educational influence of the church. Yet the clerical position was not seriously undermined until the 1910 revolution. The new Constitution of 1917 inaugurated a bitter and violent conflict, which occasionally erupted into civil war and dominated Mexican politics for decades. Strife was greatest after 1926 when President Calles sought to give effect to the religious provisions of the Constitution and again between 1934 and 1937 under President Cárdenas. In the contest much ecclesiastical property was secularized and some areas were deprived of priests and sacraments. The

From British and Foreign State Papers, CXI ( 1917-1918) ( London, 1921). Copyright, 1921, by H. M. Stationery Office. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.

-323-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.