Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

Religious Ceremonies and Rites

29. In state and other public premises . . . it shall be absolutely prohibited:

a) To conduct religious rites. . . .

b) To exhibit religious images of any description. . . .

30. The local Soviet authorities shall adopt every suitable measure to eradicate such practices. . . .

Note: The removal of religious images of artistic or historic value, as well as decisions concerning their further fate, shall be attended to with the consent of the Commissariat of Education.

31. Religious processions, and the performance of religious rites in streets and public places, shall be permitted only by written permission of the local Soviet authorities. . . .

32. The local Soviet authorities shall remove, or cause the . . . concerned persons to remove, from churches and other houses of prayer . . . all articles offending the religious feelings of the labor masses, such as: . . . inscriptions . . . in memory of any persons who were members of the dynasty overthrown by the People, or its supporters.


Religious Instruction and Teaching

33. In view of the separation of School and Church, instruction in any creed must not in any case be permitted in state, public, and private educational establishments, with the exception of purely theological establishments.

34. All credits voted for religious instruction in schools shall be immediately stopped, and leaders of religious creeds shall be deprived of all rations and supplies hitherto issued to them. No state or other public institution shall have the right to issue the instructors of religion any monies. . . .

35. The buildings of spiritual, educational and training establishments of any creed, as well as of the parish church schools, shall, as national property, be turned over to the local Soviets . . . or to the Commissariat of Education.

Note: The Soviets . . . may lease or let such buildings for the purpose of establishing in them special training establishments of any religious creed, on general conditions applicable to all citizens, and with the knowledge of the Commissariat of Education.

Source: Boleslaw Szczesniak (ed.), The Russian Revolution and Religion (Notre Dame, 1959), pp. 40-46.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

References for Document 127.

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