Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

the cultivation of better leadership personnel, and reform in systems of church organization. As regards their more general work, they should emphasize antiimperialistic, anti-feudalistic and anti-bureaucratic-capitalistic education, together with such forms of service to the people as productive labor, teaching them to understand the New Era, cultural and recreational activities, literacy education, medical and public health work, and care of children.

Source: Francis Price Jones (ed.), Documents of the Three-Self Movement, Source Materials for the Study of the Protestant Church in Communist China ( New York, 1963), pp. 19-20.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

G. T. Brown, Christianity in the Peoples Republic of China ( Atlanta, 1983) pp. 75-86.

R. Bush, Religion in Communist China ( Nashville, 1970), pp. 170-208.

C. Cary Elwes, China and the Cross: A Survey of Missionary History ( New York, 1957), pp. 181-285.

F. P. Jones, The Church in Communist China ( New York, 1962).

K. S. Latourette, Christianity in a Revolutionary Age ( New York, 1958- 1962), V, 371-411.

L. T. Lyall, Come Wind, Come Weather, The Present Experience of the Church in China ( Chicago, 1960).

L. M. Outerbridge, The Lost Churches of China ( Philadelphia, 1952).

F. A. Varg, Missionaries, Chinese, and Diplomats: The American Protestant Missionary Movement in China, 1890-1952 ( Princeton, 1958), pp. 274-318.


164
Declaration of the Peking Chinese Christian Conference April 1951

The chief means whereby Chinese Protestantism was drawn into conformity with Communist policy was the Three Self Reform Movement. Advocating "self-support, self-government, self-propagation," the movement justified the government's uncompensated confiscation of mission properties and Christian institutions and skilfully exploited an older Chinese Christian restlessness under missionary authority and paternalism. The movement was formally launched at a Peking conference called for April 16 to 21 by the government Religious Affairs Bureau. Convened ostensibly to guide organizations that had been in receipt of American aid, the conference recognized the Three Self Reform Committee, of which Y. T. Wu was chairman, and inaugurated a denunciation campaign against individual missionaries and Chinese allegedly under Western influences. This statement, supposedly representing the opinion of the 151 delegates, was released at the conclusion of the conference.

At this time when the strength of peace is growing among the people of the world, imperialism has already reached its last days. The encroachment of American

-430-

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