Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

The Synod resolves that its decision regarding the status confessionis be officially handed to the NGK at its General Synod sitting in Pretoria and that it also be sent to the different regional synods.

The NG Mission Church regrets that its relationship with the NGK is seriously threatened. The Synod is of the opinion that the road of reconciliation can only be walked if the NGK confesses its guilt . . . and concretely demonstrates her repentance by working out what the consequences of this confession of guilt mean in both Church and state. . . .

Source: John De Gruchy and Charles Villa-Vicencio (eds.), Apartheid is a Heresy ( Cape Town, 1983), pp. 175-181.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

G. D. Cloete and D. J. Smit (eds.), A Moment of Truth: The Confession of the Dutch Reformed Mission Church ( Grand Rapids, Mich., 1984).

References for Document 169.

Source for this document.


Latin American Catholicism and Liberation Theology

172
Medellín Conference of Latin American Bishops (Extracts) September 1968

In the mid- twentieth century "liberation theology" became a significant component of Latin American Catholicism. During colonial centuries the church had been closely and often uncritically allied with Spanish state and culture, a pattern only slightly modified by nineteenth-century independence and republicanism. But by the end of the century political liberalism, religious indifference, and anticlericalism sapped Catholic vitality, and "secularization" made an appearance, especially among the urban bourgeoisie. Not until the 1930s were new stirrings evident. Then, as economic depression weakened liberal confidence and reactionary authoritarian regimes revived (sometimes with religious support), a Catholic intellectual quickening began to develop, stimulated by both European and Latin American theologians and social theorists. Organizationally also, revitalization was signaled by the founding of the General Conference of the Latin American Episcopate at Rio de Janeiro in

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