Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History

By J. F. MacLear | Go to book overview

psychological pressure . . .; their policy of intimidation has created a deep gulf between Christians and the State.

Our ideal is a free Church in a free State which would allow dialogue and cooperation between the two.

Source: Religion in Communist Lands, Vol. VII, No. 3 ( 1979), pp. 170-173.


SUGGESTIONS FOR BACKGROUND AND REFERENCE

T. Beeson, Discretion and Valour, Religious Conditions in Russia and Eastern Europe ( Philadelphia, 1982), pp. 350-379.

J. Broun, Conscience and Captivity. Religion in Eastern Europe ( Washington, D.C., 1988), pp. 199-244.

N. C. Nielsen, Revolutions in Eastern Europe. The Religious Roots ( Maryknoll, N.Y., 1991), pp. 103-115.

A. Scarfe, "A Call for Truth: An Appraisal of Rumanian Baptist Church-State Relations", Journal of Church and State, Vol. 21, No. 3 (Autumn 1979), pp. 431-449.

----, "Dismantling a Human Rights Movement: a Romanian Solution", Religion in Communist Lands, Vol. VII, No. 3 ( 1979), pp. 166-169.

P. Walters (ed.), World Christianity: Eastern Europe ( Eastbourne, England, 1988), pp. 247- 270.


183
Dissident Catholicism in Hungary: "Marton Hartai's" Open Letter and Bulányi's Letter to Cardinal Lékai (Extracts) September 1980 and March 7, 1982

State management of churches in Communist East Europe frequently led to bitter division in the religious community. Through control of seminaries, ordinations, and parish and episcopal appointments, governments often gained ascendancy over official church structures. Domination was further enhanced by espionage, censorship, use of informers, and imprisonment or forced emigration of objectors. Most states also sponsored collaborating clerical bodies, such as "Pacem in Terris" in Czechoslovakia and the "Peace Priests" elsewhere. Many church leaders defended conciliation as a policy of realism, a price to be paid for survival. Yet some religious people, clerical and lay, viewed such accommodation as subservience to the enemies of Christianity and betrayal of the faithful. The result was a tendency to see church hierarchy and government bureaucracy as confederated foes of true religion.

In Hungarian Catholicism the Mindszenty tradition of intransigeance was abandoned after the cardinal's deposition ( 1974) by the Vatican and

From Religion in Communist Lands, XI, No. 1 ( 1983), XII, No. 1 ( 1984). Copyright, 1983, 1984 by Keston College, publisher. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.

-488-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Church and State in the Modern Age: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.