7
MANUFACTURING, COMMERCE, AND TRANSPORTATION

MANUFACTURING AND INDUSTRY

BY 1867 cotton and woolen mills were to be found at Bastrop, New Braunfels, and Waco and three others were being constructed, two at Houston and one at Palestine.The Bastrop Manufacturing Company possessed 1,100 spindles and enough looms to produce from 800 to 1,000 yards of material daily, in addition to yarns. This company, the oldest of its kind in the state, was representative of the others then in existence.1

A conception of 1870 manufacturers may be acquired from a description of exhibits at the first state fair, held in Houston in May, 1870. The account was taken from a report prepared by fair directors. John H. Reagan was president.

The fair was attended by 25,000 to 30,000 people, 10,000 of them coming the second day alone; there were nine departments and nearly a thousand entries. Every one visiting the grounds expressed surprise and pleasure at the number and variety and quality of the articles exhibited, a large proportion of which were produced and manufactured in Texas. The cotton and woolen goods manufactured at. New Braunfels and Houston compared favorably with goods of the same class from any part of the United States. Texas brooms and saddles were excellent. There were childen's carriages, buggies, rockaways, wagons, and a superbly built railway passenger car. A plow invented, patented, and manufactured out of Texas aterial by a Texas man won first honors. It came from Wise County on its own wheels, and on the journey of three hundred miles stopped on the way to break ground, thus paying its own expenses for travel. The best road wagon was

____________________
1
Texas Almanac, 1867, p. 236.

-151-

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