The Psychology of Superstition

By Gustav Jahoda | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
The Prevalence of Superstition

In Africa, the Women's Guilds and mothers' meetings of the churches are the embatfied advance guard in a desperate fight against the forces of witchcraft and superstition enslaving a continent and its people.

From an article in a church magazine, January 1966

There is a robust nineteenth-century complacency in the above outburst -- they are superstitious and we are enlightened. How far is either true? Let us admit, first of all, that 'they'are indeed superstitious. This has already been indicated with reference to traditional beliefs, and there is no doubt that notions of witchcraft, sorcery and magic remain well entrenched in Africa today. Such notions are by no means confined to traditional spheres of life, but have become adapted to modern Western ones. Magical medicines are widely available for passing examinations or gaining promotion in one's job. In Ghana in 1955 it was found necessary to amend the electoral law so that anyone who, among other things,

...administers, invokes or makes any other use of any fetish, or makes any other invocation, or purports to cast any spell, and relates any such act to or connects any such act with the voting or refraining from voting by any person at any election shall be guilty of an offence.

Since then there have been many reports about magic becoming mixed up with politics from other parts of Africa. But why single out Africa? In India the astrologers have an important voice in the land. Readings are usually taken before marriages are contracted, and the advice of the stars is often sought for other important decisions. When the astrologers prophesied the end of the world

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Psychology of Superstition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 158

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.