Privatization in Central and Eastern Europe: Perspectives and Approaches

By Demetrius S. Iatridis; June Gary Hopps | Go to book overview

and inequality. Privatization is increasingly unpopular, cynically referred to as privatizatsiya (in Russian), or "grabification," the giving away of government wealth to a few well-connected and unscrupulous businesspersons and bankers. Moreover, critics have pointed out, only a few state monopolies are denationalized and benefit mainly the rich, and many of the companies that CEE governments planned to privatize will not be privatized in the near future. Governments still influence denationalized enterprises, while rapid and premature privatization threatens jobs and sociopolitical stability. Former elites and Communist managers are dominant on boards of enterprises. Most important, national objectives may no longer be achieved by privatized companies taken over by foreign or even domestic investors. In brief, privatization is not a goal in itself but, rather, a means of improving the quality and cost of living.

Several crucial questions remain for each CEE country. What is the most effective state-market relation and public-private mix of responsibility? Is privatization the answer, or are broader institutional redesigns, through which the state-market relationship and development planning can be balanced and enhanced, better solutions? Should CEE countries follow the North American or European style of capitalism or introduce yet another model of public-private responsibility? Should they have first prepared the legislative, social, psychological, legal, ideological, and educational groundwork and educated the public for radical societal changes? Should the welfare state be enhanced (rather than dismantled) to deal with new poverty, unemployment, inequality, social stratification, deprivation, and the concentration of power in the hands of a few elites (mainly former functionaries, managers, and members of the organized mafia) (on this point, see Frydman and Rapaczynski, 1994a; Frydman, Rapaczynski, and Earle, 1993; Hemming and Mansoor, 1988)? Should citizens have adequate opportunities to participate in and experiment with privatization methods, rather than being exposed to models suggested by foreign consultants and international financial organizations? Is the issuing of shares to all citizens and the investment fund approach an effective way to privatize state-owned enterprises?

In a time of global technological change, the two central problems facing the East and West are social and economic insecurity and a sense of moral purpose- distributive justice amid widespread social fragmentation. The challenge is to integrate systems of social and economic exchange that link human-social and economic factors in balanced ways. The balanced relation of public responsibility and market freedom, of social and economic markets, is crucial if transformation is to succeed in the modern global economy. In this context, global privatization marks the beginning of a significant new chapter in the great debate about how much government is good for us.


REFERENCES

Bass A. ( 1995, January 25). "Weld to Privatize Acute Care for Uninsured Mentally Ill". Boston Globe, p. 1.

Bendick M., Jr. ( 1989). "Privatizing the Delivery of Social Welfare Services: An Idea toBe Taken Seriously"

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Privatization in Central and Eastern Europe: Perspectives and Approaches
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.