Hierarchy and Trust in Modern Mexico and Brazil

By Luis Roniger | Go to book overview

Preface

When in Brazil in November 1981, I decided I would like to buy some paintings by Brazilian artists. To this end, a recently made friend of mine, David M., took me to an art fair in Rio de Janeiro. David, a civil engineer, led me to the stand of one of his "friends." I was impressed by the style of the paintings, and decided to buy one of a sad-looking mother and child on the background of favela (shantytown) dwellings. When I inquired as to the price, the following dialogue ensued between David and José L., the painter:

J.L.: I don't know . . . (Facing D.M.) What do you think of 4,000 cruzeiros?

D.M.: You should know; you are the painter.

J.L. (to me): Nowadays materials are very expensive . . . and the painting has much work in it . . .

D.M. (to J.L.): I think 3,000 cruzeiros is a just price.

Once the price was settled, I tried to pay, but David assured me that there was no hurry; in one or two days the painter would frame his work so that it would not be damaged in my suitcase. I insisted on paying, and David kept trying to convince me to postpone payment. Finally, he told me to give him (David) the money, and he would give it to José. David then told José that I was planning to take his picture to Jerusalem and show it to friends there, and who knows, maybe some more pictures would be ordered from overseas. It wouldn't be a bad idea, David affirmed, to give one more picture to me as a present. I tried in vain to protest, asserting that this was not necessary. But the painter accepted David's suggestion (willingly or not, I can't say) and wrapped a second picture of my choice. Since I insisted on paying after that, David finally agreed that I should give José 1,000 cruzeiros and pay the rest later. Once we left the painter, David told me: "If you had paid him the whole sum at once, he would only have

-xi-

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Hierarchy and Trust in Modern Mexico and Brazil
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter 1 Clientelism and Trust 1
  • Notes 19
  • Chapter 2 Hierarchy and Clientelism in Latin America 21
  • Notes 33
  • Chapter 3 the Institutional Context of Mexico and Brazil 35
  • Notes 54
  • Chapter 4 Clientelism in Mexico 57
  • Notes 93
  • Chapter 5 Clientelism in Brazil 97
  • Notes 141
  • Chapter 6 Cross-National Comparison of Mexican and Brazilian Clientelism 145
  • Notes 156
  • Chapter 7 Multi-Dimensional Comparison of Network Variability 159
  • Notes 177
  • Chapter 8 Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Mexican and Brazilian Clientelism 179
  • Conclusion 197
  • Notes 199
  • Bibliography 203
  • Index 233
  • About the Author 237
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