Instruction: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives

By Ronna F. Dillon; James W. Pellegrino | Go to book overview

9 Training Analysis and Design for Complex Aircrew Tasks
Bernell J. Edwards Joan M. Ryder
I. Complexities and Cognitive Workload
II. Training Analysis and Design
III. Cognitive Approaches to Instruction
IV. Problem Solving
V. Decision Making
VI. Cognitive Task Analysis
VII. Skill Automaticity
A. Task Analysis
B. Structure of Training
C. Sustainment of Practice
D. Time/Trials to Criterion Performance
E. Skill Transfer
F. Training Program Payoffs
VIII. Summary
IX. References

Continuing advances in technology offer the potential for significant improvements in the training effectiveness of aircrew programs, but without a clear roadmap of scientifically based training methodology to guide technology application, that potential may remain unrealized. This chapter discusses some aspects of developing improved methods of training analysis and design as a part of improved technology applications for aircrew training programs. Particular emphasis is given to cognitive psychology as a promising avenue of improved training analysis and design.


COMPLEXITIES AND COGNITIVE WORKLOAD

The complex tasks confronting pilots and aircrew members have been analyzed and described by Roscoe et al. ( 1980) as comprising procedural, perceptual motor, and decisional performance elements. The growing complexity of combat missions and the sophistication of aircraft contribute to an increasing demand upon the mental capacity of aircrews. Aspects of this increasing complexity appear in aircraft systems, information display, and combat missions.

Increases in the power and capability of modern combat aircraft require pilots and aircrews to develop knowledge and skills for numerous tasks such as

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