Self-Regulation Theory: How Optimal Adjustment Maximizes Gain

By Dennis E. Mithaug | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
Self-Regulated Thinking

For centuries philosophers had us believe the raison d'être for thinking was to induce the ideal and deduce the real. From Plato's ideal forms in 350 B.C. and Immanuel Kant 1781 Critique of Pure Reason to Alfred North Whitehead The Concept of Nature in 1920, searches for fundamental order and logic in knowledge and truth characterized contemporary thinking about thinking. Plato developed the doctrine of archetypal ideals, the keystone of true reality. Individual experiences were fleeting, evanescent, and transitory rather than true and ideal. Ideas were real and eternal, unchangeable entities that escaped constraints of time and space. Plato's deification of idea and ideal influenced Greek thinkers like Aristotle, Roman philosophers, fathers of the Christian Church, scholastics of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and even some nineteenth-century German philosophers.

By the eighteenth century, Immanuel Kant had classified thought into the analytic and the synthetic. Analytic thinking was propositional, expressing truth through statements like "Cold water is water," which depended upon equivalence between subject and predicate (both contained "water"). Synthetic thinking, by contrast, was not self-evident. Verification that "The water is cold" required touching it or taking its temperature. Kant subdivided analytic and synthetic into empirical and a priori. Empirical knowing required direct contact with environments through sense perception (checking water to see if it was cold); a priori knowledge was possible through pure thought ("two plus two equals four"). The resulting four-fold epistemological system--empirical- analytical, empirical-synthetic, analytical--a priori, and synthetic--a priori--led Kant in Critique of Pure Reason to discover synthetic--a priori judgements, which were later to provide the philosophical foundation for transcendentalism. According to this view, all objects in the material world are unknowable, non-

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Self-Regulation Theory: How Optimal Adjustment Maximizes Gain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xv
  • Chapter 1 - The Problem of Adaptation 1
  • Notes 16
  • Chapter 2 the Nature of Problem Solving 19
  • Notes 40
  • Chapter 3 - The Theory of Self-Regulation 43
  • Notes 61
  • Chapter 4 - Self-Regulated Thinking 63
  • Notes 81
  • Chapter 5 - Self-Regulated Doing 85
  • Notes 116
  • Chapter 6 - Maximum Gain 119
  • Notes 146
  • Chapter 7 - Self-Determined Gain 149
  • Notes 178
  • Chapter 8 - Innovative Gain 183
  • Conclusion 205
  • Appendix 209
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 223
  • About the Author 235
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 240

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.